Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

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Soil Health

Excess rains and droughts of the past decade pointed out the poor health and productivity of soils on many local vegetable farms. Coupled with high fuel prices and high fertilizer prices, growers have been eager to improve their soil management efforts. Reduced tillage leads to less fuel use and legume cover crops allow the farmer to grow nitrogen fertilizer, reducing their need for conventional fertilizer and the fuel and labor to apply it.

The Cornell Soil Health Test can be used to determine your field's soil management for percentage of water-stable aggregates. A soil with low % water-stable aggregates has  poor crop emergence, more crusting, more runoff, reduced root growth, increased root diseases, and fewer beneficial microbes to cycle soil nutrients.

Vegetable farms using conventional tillage and few cover crops had an average of just 18% water-stable aggregates, while farms using reduced tillage or extensive cover cropping averaged 36-39%. Innovative growers are now beginning to adopt both strategies to improve soils even more.

In addition, the Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture program is working with a number of conventional and organic vegetable growers on increasing the use of a wide range of cover crops to fill open niches in rotations to improve soil health and grow nitrogen.






How to Take a Soil Sample

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: January 14, 2019
How to Take a Soil Sample

Soil sampling is an important part of managing your crops, but it's important to do it correctly. In this video, ENYCHP vegetable specialist Amy Ivy demonstrates how to take a soil sample.


Recording of Fitting Cover Crops in Vegetable Systems Webinar Nov 8, 2018

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 8, 2018
Recording of Fitting  Cover Crops in Vegetable Systems Webinar Nov 8, 2018

This is a recording of an hour long webinar held by Amy Ivy and Chuck Bornt of the Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program and Mike Davis of the Cornell University Willsboro Research Farm on Nov 8, 2018.

A copy of the PowerPoint is included in the 'read details' section below. With funding from the Northern NY Agricultural Development Program.



It's Time to Test Your Soils

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: September 14, 2018

Fall is the best time to test your soils so that any amendments you add, especially if you need to change your pH, have time to take effect before the next growing season. Both lime (which raises pH) and sulfur (which lowers pH) need months to work. If you put this off until spring your soil may be too wet and the soil labs get backed up with all the other last minute samples, so try to get this important task done this fall.


Reduced Tillage in Organic Systems Field Day Program Handbook

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: August 20, 2018

Resources from the July 2018 Reduced Tillage in Organic Systems Field Day


Why you should pay attention to pH and alkalinity

Teresa Rusinek, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 9, 2018
Why you should pay attention to pH and alkalinity

Adjusting Water pH and alkalinity improves the performance of pesticides and other products you use during crop production.  In high tunnels and greenhouses, injecting sulfuric or citric acid avoids nutrient tie up in soil and media. 


Farming and Agricultural Supplies List

Last Modified: April 29, 2016

Check out our list of the following Agricultural Resources!
Agricultural Organizations
Custom Spraying
Drainage
Equipment
Farm & Food Sanitation
Fertilizers & Feed
Fencing
Food Processing
Irrigation
Land Management
Land Preservation
Farmers Market Associations
Bee Keeping
Auctions
Consulting
Loans
Construction
Excavation
Insurance
High Tunnels
Maple Supplies
Grain Buyers
Grapes
Organic Certification
Soil Testing




ENYCHP Field Cultivation Day

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 27, 2016

On Saturday July 25th, farmers from across the Hudson Valley gathered at the Farm Hub for an afternoon dedicated to demonstrating innovative cultivation equipment in action on the farm's expansive vegetable fields.

Cover Crops for Vegetable Growers Website

Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: August 17, 2015
Cover Crops for Vegetable Growers Website

This website enables growers to use a broader range of cover crops to improve soil health in many ways. Cover crop descriptions, seeding, seed sources, cost and management challenges are included.




Phytophthora Webinar 3: Management practices to reduce P-Cap on the farm

Last Modified: May 13, 2013
Phytophthora Webinar 3: Management practices to reduce P-Cap on the farm

This recorded webinar features Dr. Meg McGrath for a discussion of fungicides for P-Cap, crop rotation strategies, and the use of biofumigants to control P-Cap in infected fields.

Making the Most of Cover Crop Mixtures

Last Modified: April 22, 2013
Making the Most of Cover Crop Mixtures

Cover crops are an important tool that farmers can use to generate benefits and services on the farm and for society, including improved soil health, nutrient supply to cash crops, weed suppression, insect pest management, forage production, pollinator resources, and clean water and air. There are many different cover crop species to choose from, and each cover crop species has different abilities to provide the services described above. Planting a mixture of cover crop species is one strategy that can be used to enhance and diversify the benefits that a cover crop provides. This article will describe some of the basic concepts to consider when planning a cover crop mixture, such as meeting different farm management objectives, selecting complementary species, and methods for establishing cover crop mixtures.

Preventing Muck Soil Erosion by Reducing Tillage in Onion Production

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 7, 2013
Preventing Muck Soil Erosion by Reducing Tillage in Onion Production

The problem with using conventional tillage practices for onion production on muck soils is that it results in the subsidence of muck via wind and water erosion and oxidation of organic matter at a rate of one foot every 10 years, which is not sustainable for preserving these non-renewable natural  resources for long-term productivity. Onions are one of the most valuable vegetable crops produced in New York State with the majority of the 13,000 acres being grown on muck soil. Producing onions using conventional tillage practices results in degradation of soil health and increased subsidence.

Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 27, 2012

The first in a 3-part series, this pre-recorded webinaris presented by Dr. Chris Smart, Cornell University. 

Flooding in 2011 spread Phytophthora capsici into fields with no history of the disease. Growers who have not managed P. capsici previously could inadvertently and permanently spread the disease to additional fields and could experience high rates of crop loss due to improper management of the disease.  Understanding of P. cap will reduce the probability of these negative outcomes on eastern NY farms.


Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 27, 2012

The first in a 3-part series, this pre-recorded webinaris presented by Dr. Chris Smart, Cornell University. 

Flooding in 2011 spread Phytophthora capsici into fields with no history of the disease. Growers who have not managed P. capsici previously could inadvertently and permanently spread the disease to additional fields and could experience high rates of crop loss due to improper management of the disease.  Understanding of P. cap will reduce the probability of these negative outcomes on eastern NY farms.


Webinar: Farming with P-Cap: Managing Your Crops and Minimizing Spread

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 8, 2012
Webinar: Farming with P-Cap: Managing Your Crops and Minimizing Spread

In this pre-recorded webinar, Dr. Michael Mazourek, plant breeder at Cornell University, and Dr. Chris Smart, plant pathologist at Cornell University Geneva Experiment Station lead a discussion about how to minimize the impact of Phytophthora capsici on your farm.


more crops
Apples

Apples

Apricots

Apricots

Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Blueberries

Blueberries

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cherries

Cherries

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Grapes

Grapes

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Nectarines

Nectarines

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peaches

Peaches

Pears

Pears

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Plums

Plums

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Raspberries / Blackberries

Raspberries / Blackberries

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Strawberries

Strawberries

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops

Upcoming Events

Cleaning & Sanitizing on Produce Farms

March 11, 2021

The Institute for Food Safety at Cornell University, UVM Extension Ag Engineering, and CCE Orange County, CCE Dutchess County, and CCE ENYCHP are hosting a workshop on Cleaning and Sanitizing on Produce Farms and in Packing Facilities. This remote 3.5 hour webinar will provide:

  • A brief review of microbial risks in produce farms and packing facilities
  • Conducting a Sanitation Operational Assessment
  • Presentations focused on the: o Basics of wet and dry cleaning and sanitizing o Value and importance of sanitation SOPs
  • A hands-on exercise writing a sanitation SOP

view details

Modern Stone Fruit Training Systems Webinar

March 16, 2021

While yields of stone fruits planted to traditional orchard systems have been lagging behind our modern apple plantings in the northeast, research is actively being conducted to utilize improved rootstocks and modern, narrow training systems to increase productivity and reduce labor costs in peach and cherry systems. 

In this webinar, we will be joined by Dr. Jim Schupp, Dr. Greg Lang, and Dr. Terence Robinson, as they discuss improved strategies for growing peaches and cherries in the northeast.

view details

How to Obtain a Pesticide Applicator License - March 23

March 23, 2021

Thinking about becoming a certified pesticide applicator in New York?  This online program will cover the basics of who needs a pesticide license, license types, examination procedures, and important information to know for the test.  We will incorporate interactive practice questions and activities within the program to test participant knowledge in preparation for the exam.

 

view details

Announcements

U-Pick Farm Practices During Covid-19 Pandemic

U-Pick is a critical direct marketing approach for many of our farms and provides
customers with a unique connection to fresh produce grown close to home. In light
of what we understand about the spread of COVID-19, new management practices
will be needed to protect your farm team and your customers. This document
provides recommended practices and communication strategies for U-Pick
operations for the 2020 season.

https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_864.pdf

Growers-are you running low on fall pumpkins, etc?

The Produce Auctions located around the state may have what you need.  Check out all of the opportunities here: https://harvestny.cce.cornell.edu/submission.php?id=4

Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


Podcasts

Into the Weeds (New York State IPM)Highlight

February 25, 2021
Today we’d like to highlight a new podcast called “Into the Weeds” from our colleague Dr. Bryan Brown, the Integrated Weed Management Specialist with the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program based in Geneva, New York. In this fascinating episode, Bryan Brown, and guest Cerruti Hooks, Associate Professor & Extension Specialist at the University of Maryland, discuss how we can tailor our weed management to increase populations of beneficial insects. Some key terms used in this episode include "herbivores," referring to insects that feed on our crops, "predators," referring to organisms that feed on herbivores, and "parasitoids," referring to insects that deposit their larvae in herbivores, where they feed, develop, and eventually kill the host.

For more information on weed IPM, check out their website: https://nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/weed-ipm/ A transcript of this episode is available at the following link: https://cornell.box.com/s/xihbn6j5t3ic31q368g1smwe2ibxobdu

listen now

read transcript

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