Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

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  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

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Cucumbers

Cucumbers In 2011 there were approximately 3,000 acres of cucumbers grown in New York worth $19 million (2011 Vegetable Summary). The majority of this production is for fresh consumption, including small scale retail operations, as well as wholesale production to serve larger markets throughout the Northeast U.S. In addition to open field production cucumbers are increasingly grown inside greenhouses and high tunnels. The crop, when unhindered by pests and diseases, can provide high yields within a short harvest window. Cucumber production in New York is increasingly under threat from the foliar disease Downy Mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis). Thus the Cornell Vegetable Program is collaborating with partners to conduct advanced on-farm research to enhance production and marketing of cucumbers, including the development of improved varieties suited for organic agriculture. Stay tuned for more information on this project. In the meantime check out results from our variety trials and grafting work with cucumbers below.

Relevant Events

Field Day at Philia Farm

Event Offers DEC Credits

August 5, 2021
Johnstown, NY

Champlain Valley Summer Field Afternoon

Event Offers DEC Credits

August 19, 2021
Chazy, NY

Fungicides labeled for Cucurbit Downy Mildew

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: July 14, 2021

2020 Powdery Mildew Fungicide Table

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: July 21, 2020

Cucurbit Downy Mildew Fungicide Table

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: July 21, 2020

Guidelines on Managing Cucurbit Downy Mildew in 2020 Based on Recent Research

Last Modified: July 7, 2020

Cucurbit Downy Mildew Update

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: July 25, 2018

The wet weather coming up from the south is likely to be bringing Cucurbit Downy Mildew Spores with it. Read about control strategies in the full article, including revised recommended sprays.


Be on the Lookout for Cucumber Beetles!

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 23, 2018

Thrips damage to High Tunnel Cucumbers

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 23, 2018
Thrips damage to High Tunnel Cucumbers

Thrips populations can explode, especially under the protective conditions in a high tunnel. Bio-controls can only help at the early stages, but there are a couple of other options for organic and conventional growers to try to bring this pest under control.


A Spring Tale of Springtails

Teresa Rusinek, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 17, 2018
A Spring Tale of Springtails

The springtail is a flea beetle lookalike that typically feeds on decaying plant material, but under certain conditions may attack crops such as cucurbits. These tiny insects have been seen in several locations this past week feeding on cucumbers and garlic.


Responding to Hailstorms 2018

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 16, 2018

The fierce storm that hit much of the Eastern New York region south of Albany on Wednesday, May 15, 2018 caused tremendous wind, water, and hail damage. For growers wondering how to respond to hail damage to young plants, read more about how to best protect your crops.


LandSpring NYS Label

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 1, 2018

Copy of the LandSpring NYS DEC approved label

2018 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Vegetable Presentations

Last Modified: April 2, 2018
2018 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Vegetable Presentations

Presentations from the 2018 ENYCHP Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference held February 20th and 21st for the vegetable sections. 

Zonix Biofungicide Label

Last Modified: July 25, 2017

Timorex Gold NYS Label

Last Modified: July 18, 2017

Organic Production Guides

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: July 17, 2017
Organic Production Guides

Organic Production Guides for fruits, vegetables and dairy are available through the NYS Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. They outline general practices for growing vegetable and fruit crops using organic integrated pest management techniques.

2015 Cucumber Variety Slideshow!

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 9, 2015
2015 Cucumber Variety Slideshow!

Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 2, 2015
Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Cucumbers are an excellent high tunnel crop for spring, summer and fall production in New York State. Grown vertically, cucumbers take advantage of the space and light offered by a high tunnel. Cucumbers grown in this environment are of higher quality with higher yields. Very fast growing and yielding, they fit into crop plans that include winter greens easier than tomatoes, peppers or eggplants. 

Responding to Hailstorms

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 26, 2013
Responding to Hailstorms

While no one wants to think about the possibility of hail hitting their beautiful crops just as they start to respond to the heat and take off, the likelihood that we will see more hail seems pretty high. So let's talk about it.

Phytophthora Webinar 3: Management practices to reduce P-Cap on the farm

Last Modified: May 13, 2013
Phytophthora Webinar 3: Management practices to reduce P-Cap on the farm

This recorded webinar features Dr. Meg McGrath for a discussion of fungicides for P-Cap, crop rotation strategies, and the use of biofumigants to control P-Cap in infected fields.

Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 27, 2012

The first in a 3-part series, this pre-recorded webinaris presented by Dr. Chris Smart, Cornell University. 

Flooding in 2011 spread Phytophthora capsici into fields with no history of the disease. Growers who have not managed P. capsici previously could inadvertently and permanently spread the disease to additional fields and could experience high rates of crop loss due to improper management of the disease.  Understanding of P. cap will reduce the probability of these negative outcomes on eastern NY farms.


Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 27, 2012

The first in a 3-part series, this pre-recorded webinaris presented by Dr. Chris Smart, Cornell University. 

Flooding in 2011 spread Phytophthora capsici into fields with no history of the disease. Growers who have not managed P. capsici previously could inadvertently and permanently spread the disease to additional fields and could experience high rates of crop loss due to improper management of the disease.  Understanding of P. cap will reduce the probability of these negative outcomes on eastern NY farms.


Webinar: Farming with P-Cap: Managing Your Crops and Minimizing Spread

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 8, 2012
Webinar: Farming with P-Cap: Managing Your Crops and Minimizing Spread

In this pre-recorded webinar, Dr. Michael Mazourek, plant breeder at Cornell University, and Dr. Chris Smart, plant pathologist at Cornell University Geneva Experiment Station lead a discussion about how to minimize the impact of Phytophthora capsici on your farm.

Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2012
Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

The unheated greenhouse, or high tunnel, offers a vertical production environment suitable for crops such as indeterminate tomatoes and cucumbers. As it is a soil based system however, and passively heated, greenhouse cucumbers must be transplanted later in the spring than tomatoes, due to their intolerance for low root zone temperatures. However, cucumbers can provide good returns when grown in a high tunnel, given consistent pest control and matching variety performance with market demand. A variety trial of four greenhouse cucumbers was established in a cooperating high tunnel in the spring of 2011.

Buckwheat Strips as an Attractant of Pollinators for Vine Crops

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 12, 2012
Buckwheat Strips as an Attractant of Pollinators for Vine Crops

Download a report on using buckwheat strips to attract native pollinators to vine crops (2008). This project was funded by the Organic Farming Research Federation.

Grafting Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 25, 2011
Grafting Cucumbers in High Tunnels

Soil based greenhouse and high tunnel production of vegetables has risen dramatically in New York recently. This season extension technology offers farmers an opportunity to target market price peaks and capitalize on rising demand for locally grown produce. Considerable attention has been given, justifiably, to tomatoes in these settings. Trials by the Cornell Vegetable Program confirm that cucumbers can also be grown at a profit in tunnels.

As production continues in the same soil beds, risk of root-zone diseases and soil nutrient deficiencies increase. Grafting, the combination of two separate cultivars into one plant, could be a solution to these challenges. Evaluations of grafted tomato by the Cornell Vegetable Program revealed several advantages. This project endeavored to graft cucumbers onto a fig leaf gourd (Cucurbita ficifolia) for increased yields and cold hardiness.


more crops
Apples

Apples

Apricots

Apricots

Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Blueberries

Blueberries

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cherries

Cherries

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Grapes

Grapes

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Nectarines

Nectarines

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peaches

Peaches

Pears

Pears

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Plums

Plums

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Raspberries / Blackberries

Raspberries / Blackberries

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Strawberries

Strawberries

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops

Upcoming Events

Field Day at Philia Farm

Event Offers DEC Credits

August 5, 2021
Johnstown, NY

Join Cornell Cooperative Extension's Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture Program for a field day at Philia Farm in Johnstown, NY from 4-6 pm on August 5th. The meeting will showcase a variety of research projects, including a high tunnel pea variety trial; a storage onion trial; a leek trial; a biofungicide trial on beets; a mesotunnel insect netting trial; and a reduced tillage trial for fall vegetable crops. 

2 DEC pesticide credits will be available in category 23

Respirator Fit Testing Clinic

August 11, 2021
Warrensburg, NY

The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) and HealthWorks is pleased to provide respirator fit testing clinics in your region in 2021.

During the clinics NYCAMH will provide medical evaluations; respirator fit tests; and WPS compliant trainings on how to properly inspect, put on, take off, fit, seal check, use, clean, maintain, and store respirators.

Clinic appointments are one hour long, and groups of 4 workers can be seen at a time. Medical evaluations, fit tests, and trainings are available in both English and Spanish.

Respirator Fit Testing Clinic

August 18, 2021
Highland, NY

The New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) and HealthWorks is pleased to provide respirator fit testing clinics in your region in 2021. 

During the clinics NYCAMH will provide medical evaluations; respirator fit tests; and WPS compliant trainings on how to properly inspect, put on, take off, fit, seal check, use, clean, maintain, and store respirators. 

Clinic appointments are one hour long, and groups of 4 workers can be seen at a time. Medical evaluations, fit tests, and trainings are available in both English and Spanish.

Announcements

2021 SWD Insecticide Quick Guide

Prepare your sprayer and make sure you have the insecticides of choice on hand. Click on the following link for the revised 2021 SWD Insecticide Quick Guide: https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_981.pdf

Current recommendations are to use the most effective material you can early in the spray program - even though the population seems small. The strategy is to keep the population small for as long as possible as it's very hard to gain control after the numbers have ballooned.  

USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for Producers

USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for Producers Facing Inclement Weather

Severe weather events create significant challenges and often result in catastrophic loss for agricultural producers. Despite every attempt to mitigate risk, your operation may suffer losses. USDA offers several programs to help with recovery.

Risk Management
For producers who have risk protection through Federal Crop Insurance or the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP), we want to remind you to report crop damage to your crop insurance agent or the local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office.

If you have crop insurance, contact your agency within 72 hours of discovering damage and be sure to follow up in writing within 15 days. If you have NAP coverage, file a Notice of Loss (also called Form CCC-576) within 15 days of loss becoming apparent, except for hand-harvested crops, which should be reported within 72 hours.

Disaster Assistance
USDA also offers disaster assistance programs, which is especially important to livestock, fruit and vegetable, specialty and perennial crop producers who have fewer risk management options.
First, the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) and Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybee and Farm-raised Fish Program (ELAP) reimburses producers for a portion of the value of livestock, poultry and other animals that died as a result of a qualifying natural disaster event or for loss of grazing acres, feed and forage. And, the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) provides assistance to producers of grazed forage crop acres that have suffered crop loss due to a qualifying drought. Livestock producers suffering the impacts of drought can also request Emergency Haying and Grazing on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acres.

For LIP and ELAP, you will need to file a Notice of Loss for livestock and grazing or feed losses within 30 days and honeybee losses within 15 days. For TAP, you will need to file a program application within 90 days.

Documentation
It's critical to keep accurate records to document all losses following this devastating cold weather event. Livestock producers are advised to document beginning livestock numbers by taking time and date-stamped video or pictures prior to after the loss.

Other common documentation options include:
- Purchase records
- Production records
- Vaccination records
- Bank or other loan documents
- Third-party certification

Additional Resources
On farmers.gov, the Disaster Assistance Discovery Tool, Disaster-at-a-Glance fact sheet, and Farm Loan Discovery Tool can help you determine program or loan options.

While we never want to have to implement disaster programs, we are here to help. To file a Notice of Loss or to ask questions about available programs, contact the Rensselaer County USDA Service Center @ 518 271 1889 ext. 2. The office is open for business, however due to pandemic restrictions all in-person visits require an appointment.


Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


Podcasts

Palmer Amaranth in Specialty Crops with Dr. Lynn Sosnoskie

July 14, 2021
Weed scientist Dr. Lynn Sosnoskie discusses the threat posed by Palmer amaranth to specialty crops in the region with specialist Ethan Grundberg. Specific topics include Palmer amaranth identification, herbicide resistance, and management strategies.

Resources:
https://blogs.cornell.edu/weedid/pigweed-identification/
https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/WS/WS-51-W.pdf
https://extension.psu.edu/invasive-pigweeds-palmer-amaranth-and-waterhemp#section-1

listen now

read transcript