Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

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Cucumbers

Cucumbers In 2011 there were approximately 3,000 acres of cucumbers grown in New York worth $19 million (2011 Vegetable Summary). The majority of this production is for fresh consumption, including small scale retail operations, as well as wholesale production to serve larger markets throughout the Northeast U.S. In addition to open field production cucumbers are increasingly grown inside greenhouses and high tunnels. The crop, when unhindered by pests and diseases, can provide high yields within a short harvest window. Cucumber production in New York is increasingly under threat from the foliar disease Downy Mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis). Thus the Cornell Vegetable Program is collaborating with partners to conduct advanced on-farm research to enhance production and marketing of cucumbers, including the development of improved varieties suited for organic agriculture. Stay tuned for more information on this project. In the meantime check out results from our variety trials and grafting work with cucumbers below.
Most Recent Cucumbers Content

Be on the Lookout for Cucumber Beetles!

Crystal Stewart, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 23, 2018

Thrips damage to High Tunnel Cucumbers

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 23, 2018
Thrips damage to High Tunnel Cucumbers

Thrips populations can explode, especially under the protective conditions in a high tunnel. Bio-controls can only help at the early stages, but there are a couple of other options for organic and conventional growers to try to bring this pest under control.


A Spring Tale of Springtails

Teresa Rusinek, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 17, 2018
A Spring Tale of Springtails

The springtail is a flea beetle lookalike that typically feeds on decaying plant material, but under certain conditions may attack crops such as cucurbits. These tiny insects have been seen in several locations this past week feeding on cucumbers and garlic.



More Cucumbers Content

Responding to Hailstorms 2018
LandSpring NYS Label
2018 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Vegetable Presentations
Zonix Biofungicide Label
Timorex Gold NYS Label
Organic Production Guides
2015 Cucumber Variety Slideshow!
Cucumbers in High Tunnels
Responding to Hailstorms
Phytophthora Webinar 3: Management practices to reduce P-Cap on the farm
Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?
Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?
Webinar: Farming with P-Cap: Managing Your Crops and Minimizing Spread
Managing Phytophthora Blight in 2012
Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)
Buckwheat Strips as an Attractant of Pollinators for Vine Crops
Grafting Cucumbers in High Tunnels
» View Complete List of Cucumbers Content
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Upcoming Events

20 Minute Ag Manager Webinars: Basic Farm Finances (Pt.III)

May 29, 2018
12-12:30 PM

Understanding Assets and Liabilities vs Income and Expenses

Part of a 20 minute lunchtime webinar series held on Tuesdays this summer covering farm business management topics.  
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20 Minute Ag Manager Webinars: NYS Ag Assessment 101

June 5, 2018
12-12:30 PM

20 minute lunchtime webinars will be held on Tuesdays this summer covering farm business management topics.
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20 Minute Ag Manager Webinars: Local Zoning 101

June 12, 2018
12-12:30 PM

20 minute lunchtime webinars will be held on Tuesdays this summer covering farm business management topics.  
view details
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Announcements

Weed Management in Strawberries - Video

Dr. Bryan Brown, Integrated Weed Management Specialist with the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, begins by discussing general weed management principles, then reviews the weed control recommendations of the Cornell Pest Management Guidelines for Berry Crops, and finishes with a case study of Shenk Berry Farm.

This was recorded at the 2018 ENYCHP Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference held February 20th and 21st. 

Check out the link on Youtube here.


Confused by the WPS (Worker Protection Standard)?

Please take note: WPS pertains to all farms-organic and conventional!  To be sure that you are complying with these regulations, please view the EPA link below:
https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/2015-09/documents/comparison-chart-wps.pdf

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