Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

ENYCH Enrollment Form (PDF; 315KB)

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  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
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Online Enrollment Form

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Online Enrollment Form

Dry Beans

Dry Beans Dry edible beans are grown almost exclusively in Western NY (such as Genesee, Livingston, Monroe and Wyoming counties) and in Central NY (such as Ontario, Yates, Seneca and Cayuga counties), where soils are deep, fertile and light- to medium-textured. New York produces edible dry beans on up to 16,000 acres for local, regional (east of the Mississippi), export and organic markets. Those beans marketed regionally are either processed into canned product or packaged for the dry pack market. Value of the crop in the state varies but has averaged around $7 million/year recently.

Major types include varieties of black turtle soup and light/dark red kidney beans. Adoption of reduced, zone tillage has been occurring on a number of farms as a time and fuel-savings measure. Insect, disease and weed pests are similar to those seen on snap beans and are managed similarly. Because dry beans must mature on the plant they are out in the field much longer than snap beans, however, so there is more opportunity for diseases such as white mold to develop. Weeds must also be controlled for a much longer period.

2018 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Vegetable Presentations

Last Modified: April 2, 2018
2018 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Vegetable Presentations

Presentations from the 2018 ENYCHP Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference held February 20th and 21st for the vegetable sections. 

2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 29, 2016
2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

Have you had problem weeds slipping through your snap or dry bean weed control program? Have lambsquarters, ragweed, hairy or Eastern black nightshade, nutsedge, etc, been. escaping? Have you tried any of the newer materials or expanded application timings to try to improve your results? The 2015 update to the Herbicide for Snap and Dry Bean Weed Control chart will help you choose the best herbicide programs for your fields.


more crops
Apples

Apples

Apricots

Apricots

Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Blueberries

Blueberries

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cherries

Cherries

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Grapes

Grapes

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Nectarines

Nectarines

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peaches

Peaches

Pears

Pears

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Plums

Plums

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Raspberries / Blackberries

Raspberries / Blackberries

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Strawberries

Strawberries

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops

Upcoming Events

Farm Business Plan Writing Program

December 6, 2023 : Kickoff Week: Laying the Groundwork for Your Success

Take your farming enterprise to the next level with our dynamic 9-week online program! Join experts Liz Higgins and Bonnie Nelsen in a journey tailored for existing farm owners. Whether you're aiming for a loan, a grant, or strategic growth, our program offers the perfect blend of flexibility and expert guidance, helping you write, refine and enhance your farm business plan. Our structured approach simplifies each section of the business plan, integrating innovative resources like ChatGPT (AI) for enhanced writing assistance. Work with your farm's team, at your own pace, supported by the seasoned Farm Business Management Specialists from Cornell Cooperative Extension. Join us to turn your vision into a strategic and actionable plan, setting the stage for your farm's success!"

First Zoom Session December 6, 2023, 3:30-4:30


December 13, 2023 : Week 2: Sharpening Your Focus - Tailoring Your Plan

As we dive into Week 2, it's time to get clear about the 'why' and 'who' of your business plan. Is it a roadmap for your own farm's growth? A key to unlock loans or grants? Or a blueprint for a new agricultural venture? Understanding the purpose and audience of your plan is crucial.

Zoom Session December 13, 2023, 3:30-4:30


January 10, 2024 : Week 4: Laying the Foundation - Strategy and Competitive Edge

Welcome to Week 4 (after the break)! Now, we're getting into the heart of your business plan - the sections that really define the essence of your farm business.

Zoom Session January 10, 2024, 3:30-4:30


January 17, 2024 : Week 5: The Financial Frontier - Making Your Numbers Talk

As we step into Week 5, we're tackling one of the most critical parts of your business plan: Financial Projections. Whether you're starting fresh or expanding your farm, these numbers are the pulse of your future success.

Zoom session January 17, 2024, 3:30-4:30


January 24, 2024 : Week 6: Navigating the Market Maze - Strategies and Safeguards

Welcome to Week 6, where we explore the landscape of your market and how to navigate it successfully. This week is all about understanding your place in the market and preparing for the unexpected.

Zoom Session January 24, 2024, 3:30-4:30


January 31 - February 1, 2024 : Week 7: Cultivating Team Strength - Management and Operations

In Week 7, we turn our attention to the core of your farming operation: your team and how you work together. Just like a well-oiled tractor or a perfectly timed planting season, the efficiency and harmony of your team can make a huge difference in your farm's success.

Zoom Session, January 31, 2024, 3:30-4:30


February 7, 2024 : Week 8: Flex week - TBD

Zoom Session, February 7, 2024, 3:30-4:30


February 14, 2024 : Week 9: The Grand Finale - Crafting Your Executive Summary

We've arrived at Week 9, the culmination of our journey where we weave together the threads of your business plan into a compelling tapestry. This week is all about creating a powerful executive summary - the window through which investors, lenders, and partners glimpse into your farm's future.

Zoom Session, February 14, 2024, 3:30-4:30

New York Labor Roadshow VII

December 15, 2023
Greenwich, NY

New York Labor Roadshow VII: December 2023 Offered by New York's Ag Workforce Development Council

New York's Ag Workforce Development Council (AWDC) is currently organizing Labor Roadshow VII.  The Eastern NY event will be held on December 15 in Greenwich, NY from 8:30-4:15.

Announcements

2023 Spotted Wing Drosophila Monitoring/Management

All berry farmers are watching for monitoring reports that indicate Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) adults are in their region. Mid-season berry crops should be sprayed as soon as berries begin to ripen unless you've elected to use insect exclusion netting.

- For general information about SWD, and to enroll for free monitoring reports, visit the Cornell SWD blog https://blogs.cornell.edu/swd1/.
- Click here for the 2023 Quick Guide for Pesticide Management. 
- For some great instructional videos and fact sheets on insect exclusion netting, visit the University of Vermont's Ag Engineering blog.


Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


Podcasts

Winter Greens Grower Interviews in Northern New York

October 22, 2022
In this episode, vegetable specialist Elisabeth Hodgdon interviews Lindsey Pashow, ag business development and marketing specialist with the Cornell Cooperative Extension Harvest New York team. They discuss findings from a series of interviews with winter greens producers in northern New York. Lindsey shares production and marketing challenges associated with growing winter greens in this cold and rural part of the state, success stories and advice from growers, and tips for those interested in adding new crop enterprises to their operation.

Funding for this project was provided by the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program. The episode was edited by Miles Todaro of the ENYCHP team.

Resources:
• Crop enterprise budget resources available from Penn State Extension (field and tunnel vegetables: https://extension.psu.edu/small-scale-field-grown-and-season-extension-budgets), UMass Extension (winter spinach budgets: https://ag.umass.edu/vegetable/outreach-project/improving-production-yield-of-winter-greens-in-northeast and field vegetables: https://ag.umass.edu/vegetable/fact-sheets/crop-production-budgets), and Cornell Cooperative Extension (high tunnel vegetables: https://blogs.cornell.edu/hightunnels/economics/sample-budgets-spreadsheets/). Use these budgets as templates when developing your own crop enterprise budget.
• The Organic Farmer’s Business Handbook, by Richard Wiswall
• The Winter Harvest Handbook, by Eliot Coleman

For questions about the winter greens project discussed in this podcast, reach out to Lindsey Pashow (lep67@cornell.edu) or Elisabeth Hodgdon(eh528@cornell.edu).

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