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Cabbage

Cabbage Fertile soils and favorable climate contribute to the impressive production of cabbage in New York State. With more than 12,000 acres grown annually, New York ranks in the top three states nationally for both fresh market and kraut cabbage. Fresh cabbage is sold in retail and wholesale markets and is used for cole slaw, egg rolls and other products. Under the proper conditions, cabbage can be stored through April, making it available nearly year round. There are two large processors in Western, NY (Seneca Foods and Great Lakes Kraut). Kraut cabbage is harvested late in the fall. It is trimmed, shredded, mixed with salt and then fermented in huge vats. The product is then packed in cans, glass jars or sealed plastic bags.

Many varieties are available for fresh market, storage and kraut cabbage. Varieties also differ in their susceptibility to insects and diseases. Cornell Cooperative Extension Educators and Cornell faculty work together annually to conduct research on many aspects of cabbage production in the state. Below you will find educational information and results of our research trials.
Most Recent Cabbage Content

Organic Production Guides

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 23, 2016
Organic Production Guides

Organic Production Guides for fruits, vegetables and dairy are available through the NYS Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. They outline general practices for growing vegetable and fruit crops using organic integrated pest management techniques.

2015 Cabbage Herbicide Chart

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 1, 2015
2015 Cabbage Herbicide Chart

A chart with herbicides labeled for use in cabbage in New York for 2015. The relative effectiveness of each herbicide on different weed species is given.

Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: March 17, 2014
Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

Slugs are an increasing threat to cabbage production: The board of the New York Cabbage Research and Development Program made slug control one of their highest research priorities for the first time in 2009. Slugs are considered a sporadic pest in cabbage and are favored by cool and moist conditions, especially where crop residues are left on the soil surface. In conventional production of cabbage, slugs tend to be a problem later in the growing season along tree lines and hedgerows and in weedy patches within the field. Slugs leave large holes in the leaves with the veins intact, and can be a contaminant in the heads when they squeeze between the leaves. During the cool wet growing season of 2009, slug contaminants were the cause of several rejected loads of cabbage in New York. It is predicted that the frequency of slug problems in cabbage will increase, because more cabbage is being grown in rotation following field corn. The newer varieties of field corn are Bt-tolerant and have tougher stalks that take longer to break down, thus, these fields have more crop residue and are more favorable for slugs. It is worthwhile to investigate whether there are cost effective means for growers to manage sporadic infestations of slugs in cabbage.

View the exciting results from our 2010 trial in the final report that follows.



More Cabbage Content

Armyworms are Poised to Eat Your Vegetable Crops
2005-2006 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation
2006 Kraut Cabbage Variety Evaluation
2007-2008 Storage Cabbage Variety Trial
2008 Kraut Cabbage Variety Trial
2009-2010 Storage Cabbage Variety Evaluation
Swede Midge Website
Evaluation of Cabbage for Onion Thrips Tolerance
Onion Thrips Damage Among Cabbage Varieties
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Upcoming Events

Hands-on Tomato Pruning Workshop

May 3, 2017
4-6pm
Fort Plain, NY

Join High Tunnel Specialist Amy Ivy and Crystal Stewart for a hands-on tomato pruning demonstration in the high tunnel. We'll talk about when to prune, how to prune for earliness and yield, and how to prune both determinate and indeterminate varieties

*DEC credit has been applied for

view details

Bramble Pruning Workshop - Rulf's Orchard

May 4, 2017
3:00pm-5pm
Peru, NY

Focus will be on pruning to increase production and help control Spotted Wing Drosophila. General pest management and culture will also be discussed. There is no charge for these workshops, but we would like folks to register so that we know how to contact you. Please register here or call Marcie at 518-272-4210.
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Bramble Pruning Workshop - Cashin's Farm

May 9, 2017
3:00pm-5pm
Fultonville, NY

Focus will be on pruning to increase production and help control Spotted Wing Drosophila. General pest management and culture will also be discussed. There is no charge for these workshops, but we would like folks to register so that we know how to contact you. Please register here or call Marcie at 518-272-4210.
view details
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Announcements

Grape Specialist Hiring in Eastern New York

Eastern NY Grape Industry Growth Prompts Marketing Initiatives, Specialist Hiring
Click Here to See Full Article view details here


Eastern New York grape and wine industry growth is sparking innovative marketing initiatives and the hiring of a new regional grape specialist.

The "October 2016 Grape Production in the Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Region" report by Elizabeth Higgins, business management specialist, Hudson Valley Lab, Highland, NY, quantifies industry growth as:
. a 34 percent increase in the number of grape-growing operations 2007-2012 with a 50 percent increase in grape acres,
. the 2001-2012 doubling of grape production acres in Ulster, Columbia, Dutchess and Orange counties,
. 2001-2012 growth from nearly zero to 100-plus grape acres in Clinton, Essex, Saratoga and Washington counties, and
. 108 wineries affiliated with local grape production; with new wineries expected.


White Rot Update

NOW AVAILABLE: White Rot Fact Sheet: Click Here

Earlier in June I sent a garlic sample to the diagnostic lab hoping that I was wrong. The sample was covered in small black sclerotia, the size of poppy seeds, and white fungal hyphae crept up the stem. The results, unfortunately, matched the field diagnosis: White Rot. Within a couple days additional calls came from up and down the Hudson Valley as well as one in Western NY with similar suspicions. These samples have also gone to the lab for verification, but it looks like the latest pest to move back into the state is this nasty fungus. 

White Rot, Sclerotinia cepivorum, decimated the onion industry in New York in the 1930's before being eradicated through careful management. More recently, in 2003, it infected 10,000 acres of garlic in California, leading to the abandonment of some garlic fields and adoption of strict containment rules. White rot has been confirmed in Northeastern states over the last decade as well, with New York being one of the last to discover the disease.

The primary reason that White Rot is such a concern is because the sclerotia, or reproductive structures, can remain dormant in the soil for up to 40 years, attacking any allium crop planted into the soil under favorable conditions. This spring was ideal for infection due to the period of cool, moist weather we had. Optimal temperature for infection is 60-65 degrees F, but infection can occur anywhere from 50-75 degrees F.
Once garlic has white rot, it generally declines rapidly. Leaves will yellow and the plant will wilt, not unlike a severe fusarium infection. However, unlike with fusarium, white rot infected bulbs are covered in black sclerotia and white fungus. To add to the confusion, another disease CAN look similar. Botrytis also causes black sclerotia and white fungal growth. However, Botrytis sclerotia are quite large, often larger than a pencil eraser.

So, what do we do now? We're still working on long-term management strategies, but the most important steps to take now are vigilance when culling (look at the plants you are pulling for symptoms like you see in this article, and if they are present, call us to take a sample and have the disease verified) and, if you see anything suspicious, reduction of movement of inoculum. The main ways diseases get moved around are by dumping culls (compost, field edges, etc) and my moving soil on equipment. Throw away your culls, and wash equipment that may have come in contact with suspicious garlic or the soil it is growing in. Everything from cultivation equipment to harvest bins should be cleaned. 

We will keep learning about this disease and will keep sending out information, particularly to help you make decisions about what to sell and buy. For now, remember that the west coast has learned to manage the disease, and we will too. -Crystal Stewart, ENYCHP




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