Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

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Strawberries

Strawberries New York State ranks 8th in the nation in strawberry production. Statewide there are over 1700 acres in production yielding 3.6 million pounds with a cash value of nearly 8.5 million dollars. The vast majority of the crop is sold from late May into early July as part of the June bearing crop that is grown in a perennial matted row system. This crop has a significant emotional bond with consumers. Strawberries have long been the first locally grown crop of the season. Picking strawberries is one of the most popular agricultural activities in upstate NY with most communities hosting delicious strawberry festivals. Ninety-five percent of the crop is sold this way, often picked by customers and always for immediate fresh consumption. The remaining 5% of the crop is used for value-added processing.

With the advent of ever-bearing (also called day neutral) varieties many strawberry farmers have been able to offer NY consumers high quality, locally grown fresh strawberries later in the season - from August to November. Other production innovations include growing on plastic mulch to help reduce herbicide inputs and growing strawberries in high tunnels to lower the incidence of botrytis gray mold and other pests.

For more information about strawberry production, visit the Cornell Berry website.

SWD Insecticides Quick Guide 2020

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 16, 2020

June 2020 - Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila in New York Berry Crops - Quick Guide


Understanding Strawberry Root Problems That Impact Berry Farm Profitability

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: January 17, 2019
Understanding Strawberry Root Problems That Impact Berry Farm Profitability

Weed pressure, root disease, plant parasitic nematodes and soil insects have all been identified by strawberry industry groups as barriers to success with strawberry production in the northeast United States.  Research into best management practices has revealed that cover cropping and proper crop rotation will significantly reduce the impact of disease on strawberry production, these recommendations however, are not being used on all farms.   


Overwintering Strawberries - Timing of Fall Mulch Application and Spring Removal

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 2, 2018

Successful overwintering of strawberries is a tricky business and not giving it enough consideration can result in poor yield the following year.  


Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 20, 2018
Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila

June 2018 - Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila in New York Berry Crops - Quick Guide


Driscoll's New Berry Varieties at Baldor Bite

Elizabeth Higgins, Business Management Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 11, 2018
Driscoll's New Berry Varieties at Baldor Bite

Lessons to be learned from the breeders at Driscoll's berries...


Spray Guidelines to Manage Fungicide Resistance

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 11, 2018
Spray Guidelines to Manage Fungicide Resistance

Here's a strawberry spray guide that manages fungicide resistance, when your main objective is gray mold (Botrytis) protection:


Weed Management in Strawberries - an IPM Approach - Video

Last Modified: April 9, 2018
Weed Management in Strawberries - an IPM Approach - Video

Dr. Bryan Brown, Integrated Weed Management Specialist with the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, begins by discussing general weed management principles, then reviews the weed control recommendations of the Cornell Pest Management Guidelines for Berry Crops, and finishes with a case study of Shenk Berry Farm.

2018 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Small Fruit Presentations

Last Modified: April 2, 2018
2018  Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Small Fruit Presentations

Presentations from the 2018 ENYCHP Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference held February 20th and 21st for the small fruit section. 

Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila in New York Berries

Last Modified: June 22, 2017

A Quick Guide to Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila in New York Berry Crops

Compiled by Greg Loeb, Laura McDermott, Peter Jentsch, Tess Grasswitz, & Juliet Carroll, Cornell University. Updated regularly.

Insecticides to Control Spotted Wing Drosophila

Last Modified: July 16, 2016
Insecticides to Control Spotted Wing Drosophila

Current 2016 SWD Insecticides and Rates 

2016 Berry School - Disease Diagnosis Talk

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016

2016 Berry School - Disease Management Talk

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016

Berry School 2016- Small Fruit Resources

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016

The Commercial Storage of Fruits, Vegetables, and Florist and Nursery Stocks

Craig Kahlke, Team Leader, Fruit Quality Management
Lake Ontario Fruit Program

Last Modified: January 13, 2014

The information contained in this preliminary version of HB-66 has been assembled from information prepared by nearly 100 authors from around the world. The version posted here is a revised copy of a Draft made available online in November 2002 for author and public review and comment.

Strawberry Specific Insecticides for SWD

Last Modified: May 31, 2013
Strawberry Specific Insecticides for SWD

Spotted Winged Drosophila found locally and throughout New York and New England

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: August 7, 2012
Spotted Winged Drosophila found locally and throughout New York and New England

In light of these findings, blueberry, summer and fall raspberry and day-neutral strawberry growers are urged to be vigilant about this pest.  

Designing a Better Sprayer for Pesticide Application in Strawberries

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 2, 2012

Strawberry growers using conventional boom sprayers find it difficult to obtain good disease and insect control due to poor pesticide coverage on the undersides of leaves, on the lower leaves, and on the fruit when the strawberry plant is in full canopy. Inadequate crop protectant coverage results in higher levels of disease and insect activity translating to consumer rejection of poor quality fruit and lower overall profitability of the planting.

This project allowed an opportunity to work with strawberries: a high value crop with a low, 3-dimensional canopy. Strawberry diseases are a big concern for growers, so adequate spray coverage is important; better coverage would allow growers to make fewer applications of fungicides during the growing season.


more crops
Apples

Apples

Apricots

Apricots

Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Blueberries

Blueberries

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cherries

Cherries

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Grapes

Grapes

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Nectarines

Nectarines

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peaches

Peaches

Pears

Pears

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Plums

Plums

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Raspberries / Blackberries

Raspberries / Blackberries

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Strawberries

Strawberries

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops

Upcoming Events

Income Tax Planning for Farms that File a Schedule F

October 13, 2021 : Session 1: Tax Planning, Goals, and Foundations

Our first session will provide an overview of tax planning, the management of tax liability, and assessing your record keeping system. 

October 20, 2021 : Session 2: Understanding the Schedule F, Depreciation, Profit/Loss Determinations

The second session will delve into everything Schedule F - depreciation and classifying revenues and expenses. 

October 27, 2021 : Session 3: Income Tax Planning Strategies and Timelines

The final session will be led by a professional tax-preparer who will introduce tax planning strategies and the timeline for implementation with ample time for questions and discussion.

Wholesale Market Readiness for Vegetable and Produce Farms

October 28, 2021

Join Elizabeth Higgins and Extension Specialist with the Eastern NY Commercial Hort Team, Cornell University Cooperative Extension, and Michelle Proscia, Agriculture Educator with CCE Sullivan, for a lunchtime discussion about how farms can prepare for selling on the wholesale market and the benefits of scaling up. Topics include: labeling, recordkeeping, grading standardization of product, and post harvest handling. 

This program is supported by the USDA, NIFA Award #: 2019-70020-30347

Design Your Succession Plan

November 2, 2021 : Starting Your Succession Plan

Farmers and next generation farmers will receive an opportunity to develop and design a succession plan with sessions led by experts across the field. Attendees will learn through scenario-based learning how to relate real-life experiences to the farm transition process. This webinar series will utilize a "flipped classroom" which requires that attendees complete pre-work prior to each session. This could include watching videos, visiting websites, or completing a handout/worksheet. This pre-work should not take more than 15-20 mins each week, but will enrich your experience during each of the weekly webinars.

November 9, 2021 : Family Meetings and Conversations

Farmers and next generation farmers will receive an opportunity to develop and design a succession plan with sessions led by experts across the field. Attendees will learn through scenario-based learning how to relate real-life experiences to the farm transition process. This webinar series will utilize a "flipped classroom" which requires that attendees complete pre-work prior to each session. This could include watching videos, visiting websites, or completing a handout/worksheet. This pre-work should not take more than 15-20 mins each week, but will enrich your experience during each of the weekly webinars.

November 16, 2021 : Determining What You Want

Farmers and next generation farmers will receive an opportunity to develop and design a succession plan with sessions led by experts across the field. Attendees will learn through scenario-based learning how to relate real-life experiences to the farm transition process. This webinar series will utilize a "flipped classroom" which requires that attendees complete pre-work prior to each session. This could include watching videos, visiting websites, or completing a handout/worksheet. This pre-work should not take more than 15-20 mins each week, but will enrich your experience during each of the weekly webinars.

November 23, 2021 : The Next Generation & Your Legacy

Farmers and next generation farmers will receive an opportunity to develop and design a succession plan with sessions led by experts across the field. Attendees will learn through scenario-based learning how to relate real-life experiences to the farm transition process. This webinar series will utilize a "flipped classroom" which requires that attendees complete pre-work prior to each session. This could include watching videos, visiting websites, or completing a handout/worksheet. This pre-work should not take more than 15-20 mins each week, but will enrich your experience during each of the weekly webinars.

Announcements

2021 SWD Insecticide Quick Guide

Prepare your sprayer and make sure you have the insecticides of choice on hand. Click on the following link for the revised 2021 SWD Insecticide Quick Guide: https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_981.pdf

Current recommendations are to use the most effective material you can early in the spray program - even though the population seems small. The strategy is to keep the population small for as long as possible as it's very hard to gain control after the numbers have ballooned.  

USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for Producers

USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for Producers Facing Inclement Weather

Severe weather events create significant challenges and often result in catastrophic loss for agricultural producers. Despite every attempt to mitigate risk, your operation may suffer losses. USDA offers several programs to help with recovery.

Risk Management
For producers who have risk protection through Federal Crop Insurance or the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP), we want to remind you to report crop damage to your crop insurance agent or the local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office.

If you have crop insurance, contact your agency within 72 hours of discovering damage and be sure to follow up in writing within 15 days. If you have NAP coverage, file a Notice of Loss (also called Form CCC-576) within 15 days of loss becoming apparent, except for hand-harvested crops, which should be reported within 72 hours.

Disaster Assistance
USDA also offers disaster assistance programs, which is especially important to livestock, fruit and vegetable, specialty and perennial crop producers who have fewer risk management options.
First, the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) and Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybee and Farm-raised Fish Program (ELAP) reimburses producers for a portion of the value of livestock, poultry and other animals that died as a result of a qualifying natural disaster event or for loss of grazing acres, feed and forage. And, the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) provides assistance to producers of grazed forage crop acres that have suffered crop loss due to a qualifying drought. Livestock producers suffering the impacts of drought can also request Emergency Haying and Grazing on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acres.

For LIP and ELAP, you will need to file a Notice of Loss for livestock and grazing or feed losses within 30 days and honeybee losses within 15 days. For TAP, you will need to file a program application within 90 days.

Documentation
It's critical to keep accurate records to document all losses following this devastating cold weather event. Livestock producers are advised to document beginning livestock numbers by taking time and date-stamped video or pictures prior to after the loss.

Other common documentation options include:
- Purchase records
- Production records
- Vaccination records
- Bank or other loan documents
- Third-party certification

Additional Resources
On farmers.gov, the Disaster Assistance Discovery Tool, Disaster-at-a-Glance fact sheet, and Farm Loan Discovery Tool can help you determine program or loan options.

While we never want to have to implement disaster programs, we are here to help. To file a Notice of Loss or to ask questions about available programs, contact the Rensselaer County USDA Service Center @ 518 271 1889 ext. 2. The office is open for business, however due to pandemic restrictions all in-person visits require an appointment.


Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


Podcasts

FSMA Updates with Gretchen Wall

August 10, 2021
In this episode, Elisabeth Hodgdon discusses news and updates related to FSMA’s Produce Safety Rule with food safety specialist Gretchen Wall. They discuss inspection schedules for the 2021 season, On Farm Readiness Reviews, water testing, new resources available for growers, and more.

Resources:
Records Required by the FSMA Produce Safety Rule, by K. Woods, D. Stoeckel, B. Fick, G. Wall, and E.A. Bihn. This fact sheet includes an explanation of required records as well as printable record templates:
https://producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/sites/producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/files/shared/documents/Records-Required-by-the-FSMA-PSR.pdf

Upcoming Remote, Online, and In-Person Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Courses:
https://producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/training/grower-training-courses/upcoming-grower-trainings/

Interactive Google map of water testing labs, created by the Northeast Center to Advance Food Safety:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?amp%3Busp=sharing&mid=1C8KHM6jJszj9auYQttUbVtPKtb4eEBSJ&ll=41.22288057139939%2C-78.58548244999999&z=5\

Interested in joining the Produce Safety Alliance listserv? Sign up here to receive FSMA updates, notifications of educational opportunities and new resources, and more:
https://producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/

Contact Information:
To schedule an On Farm Readiness Review or discuss your farm’s FSMA PSR coverage status, contact Steve Schirmer (315-487–0852 or steve.schirmer@agriculture.ny.gov), or Aaron Finley (518-474-5235 or aaron.finley@agriculture.ny.gov).

Episode speakers:
Elisabeth Hodgdon, ENYCHP vegetable specialist: 518-650-5323 or eh528@cornell.edu
Gretchen Wall, Produce Safety Alliance coordinator and Northeast Regional Extension Associate: 607-882-3087 or glw53@cornell.edu

listen now