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Blueberries

Blueberries New York State has a little more than 700 acres of blueberries in production yielding about 2 million pounds of blueberries annually making it the 9th most important blueberry production state in the nation.  Increased consumer interest in dark colored fruit containing high amounts of healthful antioxidants has resulted in many more acres being planted over the past several years. This is despite the soil pH requirement of 4.5 that blueberries, a member of the acid-loving Ericaceae family require.

It takes nearly 8 years for blueberries to reach their mature production, but a well maintained planting can remain economically viable for up to 40 years or more yielding in excess of 10,000 lbs/acre. Ninety-five percent of this production is hand-picked and sold as fresh fruit with the remaining 5% going to value added products.

Highbush blueberries are grown throughout the majority of the state, but in northern NY and the Adirondacks, cultivars that are crosses between the Maine low-bush and northern high-bush blueberries result in a smaller bush that is much more winter hardy. The threat from late spring frosts remains a challenge to blueberry growers throughout the state. Blueberries have a relatively small pest complex making it a favorite berry for organic production.

For more information about blueberry production, visit the Cornell Berry website.

Most Recent Blueberries Content

Insecticides to Control Spotted Wing Drosophila

Last Modified: July 16, 2016
Insecticides to Control Spotted Wing Drosophila

Current 2016 SWD Insecticides and Rates 

2016 SWD Exclusion Study- SARE Project Report

Abigail Henderson, Senior Administrative Assistant
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 2, 2016
2016 SWD Exclusion Study- SARE Project Report

The use of insect netting on existing bird netting support systems to exclude spotted-wing Drosophila from a mature small-scale commercial highbush blueberry planting

2016 Berry School - Disease Diagnosis Talk

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016


More Blueberries Content

2016 Berry School - Disease Management Talk
Berry School 2016- Blueberry Pruning and Rejuvination
Berry School 2016- Small Fruit Resources
The Commercial Storage of Fruits, Vegetables, and Florist and Nursery Stocks
Blueberry Specific Insecticides for SWD
Cranberry and Cherry Fruit Worm
Effects of Fruit Cooling on Spotted Wing Drosophila
Spotted Winged Drosophila found locally and throughout New York and New England
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Upcoming Events

Hands-on Tomato Pruning Workshop

May 3, 2017
4-6pm
Fort Plain, NY

Join High Tunnel Specialist Amy Ivy and Crystal Stewart for a hands-on tomato pruning demonstration in the high tunnel. We'll talk about when to prune, how to prune for earliness and yield, and how to prune both determinate and indeterminate varieties

*DEC credit has been applied for

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Bramble Pruning Workshop - Rulf's Orchard

May 4, 2017
3:00pm-5pm
Peru, NY

Focus will be on pruning to increase production and help control Spotted Wing Drosophila. General pest management and culture will also be discussed. There is no charge for these workshops, but we would like folks to register so that we know how to contact you. Please register here or call Marcie at 518-272-4210.
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Bramble Pruning Workshop - Cashin's Farm

May 9, 2017
3:00pm-5pm
Fultonville, NY

Focus will be on pruning to increase production and help control Spotted Wing Drosophila. General pest management and culture will also be discussed. There is no charge for these workshops, but we would like folks to register so that we know how to contact you. Please register here or call Marcie at 518-272-4210.
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Announcements

Grape Specialist Hiring in Eastern New York

Eastern NY Grape Industry Growth Prompts Marketing Initiatives, Specialist Hiring
Click Here to See Full Article view details here


Eastern New York grape and wine industry growth is sparking innovative marketing initiatives and the hiring of a new regional grape specialist.

The "October 2016 Grape Production in the Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Region" report by Elizabeth Higgins, business management specialist, Hudson Valley Lab, Highland, NY, quantifies industry growth as:
. a 34 percent increase in the number of grape-growing operations 2007-2012 with a 50 percent increase in grape acres,
. the 2001-2012 doubling of grape production acres in Ulster, Columbia, Dutchess and Orange counties,
. 2001-2012 growth from nearly zero to 100-plus grape acres in Clinton, Essex, Saratoga and Washington counties, and
. 108 wineries affiliated with local grape production; with new wineries expected.


White Rot Update

NOW AVAILABLE: White Rot Fact Sheet: Click Here

Earlier in June I sent a garlic sample to the diagnostic lab hoping that I was wrong. The sample was covered in small black sclerotia, the size of poppy seeds, and white fungal hyphae crept up the stem. The results, unfortunately, matched the field diagnosis: White Rot. Within a couple days additional calls came from up and down the Hudson Valley as well as one in Western NY with similar suspicions. These samples have also gone to the lab for verification, but it looks like the latest pest to move back into the state is this nasty fungus. 

White Rot, Sclerotinia cepivorum, decimated the onion industry in New York in the 1930's before being eradicated through careful management. More recently, in 2003, it infected 10,000 acres of garlic in California, leading to the abandonment of some garlic fields and adoption of strict containment rules. White rot has been confirmed in Northeastern states over the last decade as well, with New York being one of the last to discover the disease.

The primary reason that White Rot is such a concern is because the sclerotia, or reproductive structures, can remain dormant in the soil for up to 40 years, attacking any allium crop planted into the soil under favorable conditions. This spring was ideal for infection due to the period of cool, moist weather we had. Optimal temperature for infection is 60-65 degrees F, but infection can occur anywhere from 50-75 degrees F.
Once garlic has white rot, it generally declines rapidly. Leaves will yellow and the plant will wilt, not unlike a severe fusarium infection. However, unlike with fusarium, white rot infected bulbs are covered in black sclerotia and white fungus. To add to the confusion, another disease CAN look similar. Botrytis also causes black sclerotia and white fungal growth. However, Botrytis sclerotia are quite large, often larger than a pencil eraser.

So, what do we do now? We're still working on long-term management strategies, but the most important steps to take now are vigilance when culling (look at the plants you are pulling for symptoms like you see in this article, and if they are present, call us to take a sample and have the disease verified) and, if you see anything suspicious, reduction of movement of inoculum. The main ways diseases get moved around are by dumping culls (compost, field edges, etc) and my moving soil on equipment. Throw away your culls, and wash equipment that may have come in contact with suspicious garlic or the soil it is growing in. Everything from cultivation equipment to harvest bins should be cleaned. 

We will keep learning about this disease and will keep sending out information, particularly to help you make decisions about what to sell and buy. For now, remember that the west coast has learned to manage the disease, and we will too. -Crystal Stewart, ENYCHP




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