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Pests

Numerous pests affect commercial vegetable production in New York. All stages of plant growth may be susceptible to insects or disease causing pathogens which may result in poor seedling emergence, reduced yields and quality issues. Similarly, weeds compete with vegetable crops for light, nutrients and water often reducing yields. Weeds can also act as a reservoir for insects and diseases. Furthermore, weed seeds and other parts can be a contaminant of certain vegetable crops.

Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Program Specialists conduct research and educational programs on many important insects, diseases and weeds in New York. While not an exhaustive list, current information on many important vegetable pests can be found below. The most recent pest content is listed below but you can find more pests under the pest categories of Diseases, Insects, and Weeds.

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PESTS CATEGORIES


Controlling Fruit Rots and Other Summer Diseases

Mike Basedow, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: July 13, 2020

This is a presentation by Dr. Srdjan Acimovic of the Hudson Valley Research Lab. In this webinar, Dr. Acimovic discusses the biology and management of summer diseases of apples. Topics covered include bitter rot, Marssonina blotch, sooty blotch/flyspeck, and more.


2020 ENY Fire Blight Sampling Form

Mike Basedow, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 22, 2020
2020 ENY Fire Blight Sampling Form

Fill out this form when sending fire blight samples.


Spring Spinach Pests

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 20, 2020

Photos of spinach downy mildew and typical spinach leafminer damage on a chard leaf.


Strategies for Dealing with Pesky Perennial Weeds

Mike Basedow, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 14, 2020
Strategies for Dealing with Pesky Perennial Weeds

Perennial weeds can be particularly difficult to manage in the apple orchard. These plants are defined as being able to live for more than two years, which is due to their abilities to produce large root systems or other underground storage structures, such as bulbs, tubers, and rhizomes. These structures facilitate the spread of perennials in orchards, although many species also produce seed that support dispersal.


Stone Fruit IPM Webinar

Mike Basedow, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 24, 2020

Recording of the Stone Fruit IPM webinar from March 16, 2020


Prepping Your Air Blast Sprayer for Spring

Mike Basedow, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 12, 2020

Sprayers must be regularly checked over to ensure that proper maintenance has been carried out and that no outstanding repairs need to be done. Faulty sprayers contribute to increased drift levels and waste money through inefficiency and overuse of chemicals.


2019 Pea Herbicide Chart

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 14, 2019
2019 Pea Herbicide Chart

A chart is presented that lists the herbicides labelled for use on succulent peas in New York for the year 2019. The relative effectiveness of each herbicide on different weed species is highlighted.


Presentations and Resources from 2019 Garlic School in Batavia

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 5, 2019
Presentations and Resources from 2019 Garlic School in Batavia

Check out the presentations and resources from the Cornell Vegetable Program's 2019 Garlic School that was held March 20th, 2019 in Batavia, NY. 


2019 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Tree Fruit Presentations

Last Modified: April 3, 2019
2019 Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference Tree Fruit Presentations

Presentations from the 2019 ENYCHP Eastern New York Fruit & Vegetable Conference held February 19-21 for the tree fruit sections.


Understanding Strawberry Root Problems That Impact Berry Farm Profitability

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: January 17, 2019
Understanding Strawberry Root Problems That Impact Berry Farm Profitability

Weed pressure, root disease, plant parasitic nematodes and soil insects have all been identified by strawberry industry groups as barriers to success with strawberry production in the northeast United States.  Research into best management practices has revealed that cover cropping and proper crop rotation will significantly reduce the impact of disease on strawberry production, these recommendations however, are not being used on all farms.   


Hot Water Seed Treatment Using a Sous Vide Device

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: January 14, 2019
Hot Water Seed Treatment Using a Sous Vide Device

Learn to use a sous vide device to heat treat seeds as a simple, economical way to control diseases.


What do biofungicides add to vegetable disease management? Part 1 - Introducing

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 12, 2018
What do biofungicides add to vegetable disease management? Part 1 - Introducing

During the summer of 2018 Amara Dunn, the NYS IPM biological pest management specialist, worked with colleagues (Elizabeth Buck, Dr. Julie Kikkert, Dr. Margaret McGrath, Jud Reid, and Crystal Stewart) on a project funded by the New York Farm Viability Institute looking at the use of biofungicides (Remember what biofungicides are?) in vegetable disease management. Dr. Darcy Telenko (formerly of the Cornell Vegetable Program) helped plan the project before starting her new position at Purdue University, and Dr. Sarah Pethybridge provided valuable advice based on her extensive work with white mold (including control with biofungicides). BASF, Bayer, BioWorks, Certis, Dow, and Marrone BioInnovations provided product for the field trials.  


2018 Northern NY Trap Data and Pest Exclusion with Hail Netting

Mike Basedow, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: October 23, 2018

During the 2018 growing season, we maintained an IPM trapping network in Northern New York, ranging from Chazy in Northern Clinton County to Rexford in Southern Saratoga County.  From May through mid-September, we sent weekly e-alerts of our trap counts for oriental fruit moth, codling moth, obliquebanded leafroller, and apple maggot.  Now that harvest is winding down, I would like to review this season's pest trends, and discuss what we observed from our hail netting trials in the Champlain Valley.


Marssonina Leaf Blotch of Apple - A Growing Problem in South-Eastern New York

Dan Donahue, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: October 23, 2018
Marssonina Leaf Blotch of Apple - A Growing Problem in South-Eastern New York

Excessive rain in New York and the rest of the Eastern US experienced in the second half of both the 2017 and 2018 growing seasons favored the development of Marssonina Leaf Blotch (MLB), a disease caused by Marssonina coronaria (sexual stage Diplocarpon mali). In early September 2017, in the lower-Hudson Valley and south NY we found MLB late in the summer in more than several apple orchards on Mutsu, Honeycrisp, NY-1 (SnapDragon), NY-2 (RubyFrost), Gala, Red Delicious, Golden Delicious, Pristine, Grimes Golden, Northern Spy, Stayman Winesap, Tompkins King, and others. The alarming outcome was defoliation of lower part of the tree crowns, especially where moisture due to heavy dew or sprinkler irrigation was present up until midday.


Cucurbit Downy Mildew Update

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: July 25, 2018

The wet weather coming up from the south is likely to be bringing Cucurbit Downy Mildew Spores with it. Read about control strategies in the full article, including revised recommended sprays.


Insecticides Labeled for Colorado Potato Beetle

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 20, 2018
Insecticides Labeled for Colorado Potato Beetle

For a chart of conventional and organic spray options for Colorado Potato Beetle:


Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 20, 2018
Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila

June 2018 - Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila in New York Berry Crops - Quick Guide


The CCE Apple Decline Survey Has Been Extended Through the Summer of 2018

Dan Donahue, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 11, 2018
The CCE Apple Decline Survey Has Been Extended Through the Summer of 2018

Cornell Extension Specialists are being asked with increasing frequency to investigate both chronic decline and rapid collapse of apple trees in young, high-density plantings in all regions of New York State.  Symptoms of chronic decline can include poor growth, off color foliage, and a generally unthrifty appearance that worsens over several years.  The death of an (apparently) previously healthy tree over the course of just a few weeks has been termed Rapid Apple Decline (RAD).  While the symptoms of chronic decline are subtler in some cases, RAD is eye-catching.  Afflicted trees appear to "burn up" mid-summer after having set and sized a normal crop load.  RAD may be a subset of the chronic decline condition or a completely different problem; causation is unknown at this time.


Copper Sprays: How they work and avoiding plant injury

Teresa Rusinek, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 7, 2018

There are various formulations of copper on the market. Each has specific label instructions for usage to help you maximize crop protection and avoid phytotoxicity. 


Onion Thrips Management Recommendations for 2018

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 7, 2018

Onion thrips populations have exceeded action thresholds in a few hot spots in Orange County. Review Dr. Brian Nault's insecticide recommendations for onion thrips management that incorporate newly registered products in New York State.


True Armyworms Invading Sweet Corn!

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 7, 2018

For the last couple of years, we have seen True Armyworms showing up in late May early June and causing some significant damage in sweet corn and other crops.  In the last two weeks we have caught low levels of adult True Armyworm moths in our sweet corn worm traps and are now starting to see the damage in sweet corn. 


Allium Leafminer Spring Flight Update

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 31, 2018

The spring flight of the new invasive insect pest, the allium leafminer, is coming to an end. However, the larval stage of the pest will remain active for a couple of more weeks and can cause significant damage to garlic, scallions, onions, and chives. Read more about how to continue to protect your spring allium crops and how to prepare for the fall flight.


Cranberry Fruitworms - a significant pest in blueberries.

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 24, 2018

Fruitworms overwinter as larvae and pupate in the spring, emerging as adult moths after the start of bloom and usually before early fruit set. Moths move into blueberry plantings when fruit is small and lay eggs directly on the fruit. The larvae hatch and tunnel into the fruit and begin feeding. Find out how to control these pests here!


OMRI and Conventional Options for Flea Beetle Suppression

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 24, 2018

Crucifer flea beetles have been feasting on brassica crops for a couple of weeks already. If your management strategy isn't working to limit damage, check out what other options are available to you.


Be on the Lookout for Cucumber Beetles!

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 23, 2018

Thrips damage to High Tunnel Cucumbers

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 23, 2018
Thrips damage to High Tunnel Cucumbers

Thrips populations can explode, especially under the protective conditions in a high tunnel. Bio-controls can only help at the early stages, but there are a couple of other options for organic and conventional growers to try to bring this pest under control.


A Spring Tale of Springtails

Teresa Rusinek, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 17, 2018
A Spring Tale of Springtails

The springtail is a flea beetle lookalike that typically feeds on decaying plant material, but under certain conditions may attack crops such as cucurbits. These tiny insects have been seen in several locations this past week feeding on cucumbers and garlic.


Lookout for Leek Moth

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 17, 2018
Lookout for Leek Moth

Leek moth adults emerge in mid April to mate and lay eggs. This year the first moths were caught in Essex on April 21.  The larvae will hatch in a couple of weeks and can do considerable damage to garlic scapes so this is a good first place to look when scouting.

Be cautious when buying and selling onion transplants between growers in the infested areas. We have seen leek moth appear in new locations when infested plants were brought in from farms to the north. 


Common Asparagus Beetle Management During Harvest Season

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 9, 2018
Common Asparagus Beetle Management During Harvest Season

Asparagus beetle populations can build up quickly over the course of a couple of seasons. Fields with heavy infestations may require the use of an insecticide during harvest season to knock down the adult population. See what your labeled options are in New York and know that later season applications to target second and/or third beetle populations may also be necessary. 


Start managing for bacterial diseases in field tomatoes at transplanting

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 9, 2018
Start managing for bacterial diseases in field tomatoes at transplanting

If you have struggled with bacterial diseases in the past few years, start managing for success now! Growers are better able to control bacterial diseases with a combination of sanitation, environmental management, and regular sprays that starts now and continues through harvest. Read on to learn about alternative sprays to copper, and how to eliminate disease lingering in your stakes from last year. 


Weed Control and Plastic Mulches

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 9, 2018
Weed Control and Plastic Mulches

As the weather warms up and plastic mulches are being laid, the next question is, what to do about weed control in the beds and between the beds?


Allium Leafminer Spring Flight Has Begun

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 3, 2018

The new invasive insect pest, the allium leafminer, has begun its spring flight. Adults are expected to be active for about four weeks; see what management options are available to reduce damage to your allium crops.


Weed Management in Newly Planted Orchards

Mike Basedow, Tree Fruit Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 3, 2018

Early weed control is a critical component of establishing a new planting. Newly planted fruit trees compete poorly against fast growing weeds for water and nutrients. This competition can severely limit a new block's growth, which can ultimately reduce potential yields in the third year by 50 percent. Weeds also harbor insects and diseases, provide habitat for rodents, and can serve as hosts for viruses, further complicating effective orchard management.


Managing Basil Downy Mildew

Teresa Rusinek, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 2, 2018

Basil is susceptible to downy mildew from emergence. Plant breeders at Rutgers have been working on developing new resistant varieties; here are some notes on those new varieties and other cultural practices to reduce the risk of loss from basil downy mildew. 


Mix and Match: Compatibility of Biocontrol with other Pest Management Strategies

Last Modified: May 2, 2018

When using any kind of bio-controls you need to know whether they are compatible with each other and any other pest management products you plan to use. A biocontrol fungus might be killed if you tank mix it with a chemical fungicide. Insecticides (whether or not they are biological) could be harmful to natural enemy insects and mites. Even some beneficial insects are not compatible with each other because they may eat each other instead of (or in addition to) the pest.  By Amara Dunn, Biocontrol Specialist, NYS Integrated Pest Management Program

 


Be on the Lookout for Southern Blight

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 27, 2018

Southern Blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) was found on golden storage beets this winter in Dutchess County. The fungal pathogen is fairly new to New York and poses a threat to a wide range of vegetable crops. Early detection and proper diagnosis are key to managing this disease.


Chlorothalonil / Bravo Shortage

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 25, 2018
Chlorothalonil / Bravo Shortage

The commonly used fungicide chlorothalonil or better known to many of you as Bravo, will be in short supply this year due to manufacturing issues.  This broad spectrum protectant will be highly sought out this spring but you can learn about some alternatives.


Allium Leafminer Active in Southern Pennsylvania

Teresa Rusinek, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 18, 2018
Allium Leafminer Active in Southern Pennsylvania

A new invasive insect pest in the Northeast known as the Allium leafminer (ALM), Phytomyza gymnostoma, damages crops in the Allium genus (e.g., onion, garlic, leek, scallions, shallots, and chives) and is considered a major economic threat to Allium growers. Originally from Europe, ALM was first detected in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in December of 2015 and in New Jersey and New York in 2016. As of fall 2017, ALM activity has been confirmed throughout eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, southeastern New York as well as Thompkins and Suffolk counties.


Moldy Sunflower Shoots

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 18, 2018

A few of our growers have struggled in late winter with gray mold growing over their flats of sunflower shoots. The mold is botrytis, growing on the outside of the hulls, and it can really ruin a flat of shoots.


Onion and Seed Corn Maggot Concerns in a Cold, Wet Spring

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 18, 2018

Last year we saw a lot of problems with root feeding damage from maggots early in the season, which has growers on edge about pest pressure this year. Seed corn maggots can damage a variety of crops, and in previous years have been observed on everything from sunflower shoots in the greenhouse to pea seedlings and onion transplants in the field. Onion maggots are more particular, and will only feed on allium hosts.


Early Season Weed Control in Berry Crops

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 13, 2018

First Flight: Considerations for Early "Worm" Management to NY Apple

Last Modified: April 6, 2018
First Flight: Considerations for Early "Worm" Management to NY Apple

The early worm' complex found in commercial apple during the pre-bloom period begins with the emergence of the speckled green fruit worm (SGFW).


NEWA Workshop Program Key Takeaways

Last Modified: April 6, 2018
NEWA Workshop Program Key Takeaways

ENYCHP hosted a NEWA training workshop in Voorheesville in April 2018. Here are some of the main takeaways from the training.


Growing Alliums for Storage & Long Term Sales Resource Guide

Last Modified: February 23, 2018

Zonix Biofungicide Label

Last Modified: July 25, 2017

Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila in New York Berries

Last Modified: June 22, 2017

A Quick Guide to Labeled Insecticides for Control of Spotted Wing Drosophila in New York Berry Crops

Compiled by Greg Loeb, Laura McDermott, Peter Jentsch, Tess Grasswitz, & Juliet Carroll, Cornell University. Updated regularly.

2017 Grape Disease Control

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 31, 2017

Wayne Wilcox has updated his annual Grape Disease Control manifesto. The document is available here.

Pink Root on Your Onion Transplants: To Plant or Not to Plant?

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 11, 2017
Pink Root on Your Onion Transplants: To Plant or Not to Plant?

Word on the Black Dirt in Orange County is that many growers are receiving Arizona-grown onion plants that are heavily infected with pink root.

Pesticide Applicator License Pre-Exam Training Slides

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 22, 2017

Slides from the Pesticide Applicator License Pre-Exam Training, held March 2017 in Plattsburgh.

2017 NENY & VT Winter Grape School Presentations

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 16, 2017

Presentations from the the Northeastern NY & VT Winter Grape School held March 9, 2017 in Lake George.


Bird Damage in Tree Fruits

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: February 27, 2017

Frugivorous birds impose significant costs on tree fruit growers through direct consumption of fruit and
grower efforts to manage birds.We documented factors that influenced tree fruit bird damage from 2012
through 2014 with a coordinated field study in Michigan, New York, and Washington. For sweet cherries,
percent bird damage was higher in 2012 compared to 2013 and 2014, in Michigan and New York
compared toWashington, and in blocks with more edges adjacent to non-sweet cherry land-cover types.
These patterns appeared to be associated with fruit abundance patterns; 2012 was a particularly lowyield
year for tree fruits in Michigan and New York and percent bird damage was high. In addition,
percent bird damage to sweet and tart cherries in Michigan was higher in landscapes with low to
moderate forest cover compared to higher forest cover landscapes. 'Honeycrisp' apple blocks under
utility wires were marginally more likely to have greater bird damage compared to blocks without wires.
We recommend growers prepare bird management plans that consider the spatial distribution of fruit
and non-fruit areas of the farm. Growers should generally expect to invest more in bird management in
low-yield years, in blocks isolated from other blocks of the same crop, and in blocks where trees can
provide entry to the crop for frugivorous birds.

Bird Damage Q&A

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: February 27, 2017

Is it OK to deploy kestrel nesting boxes in areas where there are red tail hawks?
Yes, we deploy boxes where there are red-tailed hawks. RTHAs are essentially everywhere so we can't avoid areas where they live.

Can a person raise and distribute American kestrels?
There are likely all types of regulations about this type of thing, if it's even possible, given that kestrels are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

Installing and Monitoring American Kestrel Nest Boxes in Orchards

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: February 27, 2017

Installing and Monitoring American Kestrel
Nest Boxes in Orchards by Megan Shave, Michigan State University

2017 Winter Tree Fruit School Presentations

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: February 16, 2017

Presentations given at the 2017 Eastern NY Commercial Tree Fruit Schools are available by clicking on the following links.  

2016 ENY Sweet Corn Trap Summary Presentation

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: January 3, 2017
2016 ENY Sweet Corn Trap Summary Presentation

This presentation shows a summary of 2016 peak flight times for common sweet corn pests that we monitor in eastern New York. Knowing when insects might be a peak flight is crucial to effective scouting and pesticide applications. For more pest monitoring information, please enroll in our program and be sure to read the weekly newsletters sent out during the field season. 

For more information about the trapping network, please visit: http://sweetcorn.nysipm.cornell.edu/

Pests 
European Corn Borer (NY & Iowa)
Corn Ear Worm 
Western Bean Cutworm
Fall Armyworm
Western Bean Cutworm  




White Rot Fact Sheet

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: August 31, 2016
White Rot Fact Sheet

White rot is a worldwide problem in allium production, and has resurfaced in the New York garlic industry after a long period of eradication. Positive samples were collected in 2016 from the Hudson Valley, Central and Western New York, indicating that the disease is widespread. As with other soilborne diseases, white rot can be persistent and devastating. However, careful management can reduce inoculum, and because the disease is spread by seed and soil, it is also possible to prevent its spread into uninfested fields.

Learn more in this White Rot Fact Sheet!

2016 Spider Mites and Dry Hot Weather

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: August 11, 2016

Given the hot, dry conditions this season and that vines are showing drought stress, it is extra important to be scouting for spider mites right now. Here is a brief note from Greg Loeb, Cornell Entomology, summarizing the issues and providing recommendations.



2016 Fire Blight Management Workshop

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: August 3, 2016

This is the powerpoint presentation from the August 2nd Fire Blight Workshop in Peru.

In light of the high fire blight incidence this season, Srdjan Acimovic, pathologist at the Hudson Valley Research Lab, and Dave Rosenberger, retired pathologist Hudson Valley Research Lab, offered a workshop on fire blight management. They presented information on fire blight management, conditions that led to this season's situation, and how to predict fire blight infections in the future. 

Insecticides to Control Spotted Wing Drosophila

Last Modified: July 16, 2016
Insecticides to Control Spotted Wing Drosophila

Current 2016 SWD Insecticides and Rates 

White Rot Update

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 22, 2016

White Rot, Sclerotinia cepivorum, decimated the onion industry in New York in the 1930's before being eradicated through careful management. More recently, in 2003, it infected 10,000 acres of garlic in California, leading to the abandonment of some garlic fields and adoption of strict containment rules. White rot has been confirmed in Northeastern states over the last decade as well, with New York being one of the last to discover the disease.  It is now confirmed in the ENYCHP region.  Learn more here.

Fire Blight Sampling

Last Modified: June 8, 2016
Fire Blight Sampling

Look here to find instructions, contacts, and paperwork for submitting Fire Blight samples.

2016 Grape Disease Control

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 18, 2016

Wayne Wilcox has updated his Grape Disease Control guidelines for the 2016 season. You can access the document here!

2016 SWD Exclusion Study- SARE Project Report

Abigail Henderson, Senior Administrative Assistant
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 2, 2016
2016 SWD Exclusion Study- SARE Project Report

The use of insect netting on existing bird netting support systems to exclude spotted-wing Drosophila from a mature small-scale commercial highbush blueberry planting

2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 29, 2016
2015 Herbicides for Weed Control in Snap and Dry Beans

Have you had problem weeds slipping through your snap or dry bean weed control program? Have lambsquarters, ragweed, hairy or Eastern black nightshade, nutsedge, etc, been. escaping? Have you tried any of the newer materials or expanded application timings to try to improve your results? The 2015 update to the Herbicide for Snap and Dry Bean Weed Control chart will help you choose the best herbicide programs for your fields.

2016 Berry School - Disease Diagnosis Talk

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016

2016 Berry School - Disease Management Talk

Anne Mills, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016

Fruit School 2016 - Grapevine Leaf roller & Grape Mealy bugs

Jim O'Connell, Small Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016

Fruit School 2016 -GRAPE BERRY MOTH PRESENTATION

Jim O'Connell, Small Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: March 25, 2016

2016 Beet Herbicide Chart

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: March 1, 2016
2016 Beet Herbicide Chart

This chart created in cooperation with Dr. Robin Bellinder, weed scientist at Cornell, lists the herbicides that are labeled for beets and which weed species are controlled. While the chart is a handy reference, it is critical to read the product labels thoroughly.

Presentations - 2016 Winter Tree Fruit Schools

Sarah Elone, Field Technician
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: February 22, 2016

Presentations given at the 2016 Commercial Tree Fruit Schools in Lake George (LG) and Kingston in the Hudson Valley (HV) are available by clicking on the following links.

Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes 2015

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: December 2, 2015
Leaf Mold in High Tunnel Tomatoes 2015

Leaf mold is a fungus disease of tomatoes that has been increasing across New York State in recent years. It is favored by high humidity and is therefore seen in greenhouse and high tunnel production but rarely in field production.

Vineyard Pest Management - Webinar Recording 5/13/15

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 14, 2015

One of the biggest challenges of managing a vineyard is controlling disease.  In this webinar, Wayne Wilcox and Andrew Landers provide essential information for vineyard disease management and pesticide application.

In this 2-hr webinar, Wayne Wilcox discusses major vineyard diseases, Integrated Pest management (IPM) Strategies, and resources available to guide you. Andrew Landers provides information about effective pesticide application, including sprayer calibration.




Navigating the NYS DEC: How to Get Your Certified Pesticide Applicator License

Jim O'Connell, Small Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 13, 2015

As a grape grower in the Northeast, one of your biggest challenges is combating the insects, diseases, and other pests invading your vineyard. Although you do not need a license to purchase or use some pesticides, obtaining your certified pesticide applicator license will give you access to more materials that you can add to your pest combatting-arsenal.


2015 Grape Disease Control

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 11, 2015

Wayne Wilcox has updated his Grape Disease Control guidelines for 2015.  

Apple IPM

Anna Wallis, Tree Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 24, 2015

How can you use IPM (Integrated Pest Management) to control pests in your orchard?  These presentations provide a broad overview of IPM Theory, orchard insect and disease pests, and resources available to guide your decision making, such as the NEWA weather system.  

These PPT presentations were given at the Apple IPM Training sessions on April 21 & 22, 2015.  

2015 Lima Bean Herbicide Chart

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 1, 2015
2015 Lima Bean Herbicide Chart

Baby lima beans for processing are a new crop in New York. As growers prepare to plant, they must understand the differences in herbicides for this crop compared to snap beans and dry beans. Lima beans react to some herbicides differently because they are the species Phaseolus lunatus as compared to common beans which are P. vulgaris.

Presentations - 2015 Winter Tree Fruit Schools

Last Modified: February 16, 2015

Presentations given at the 2015 Commercial Tree Fruit Schools in Lake George (LG) and Kingston in the Hudson Valley (HV) are available by clicking on the following links.  

Spotted Wing Drosophila Found

Jim O'Connell, Small Fruit and Grape Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: July 25, 2014

Positive catch SWD in Ulster County

Pruning Tomatoes

Amy Ivy, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: June 25, 2014
Pruning Tomatoes

Pruning off the lower leaves of tomatoes will increase air circulation and discourage foliar diseases. Note the arrows in the photo to see which leaves and suckers to remove.

Control of Colorado Potato Beetle & Insecticide Resistance Management

Carol MacNeil, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: June 9, 2014
Control of Colorado Potato Beetle & Insecticide Resistance Management

The CPB is known for its ability to quickly develop resistance to insecticides. There are alternatives to insecticides for managing CPB, but for growers with large fields and a limited ability to rotate fields, insecticides remain key.

New fungicides labeled for use in tree fruit - all Special Local Needs Labels

Deborah Breth, Integrated Pest Management
Lake Ontario Fruit Program

Last Modified: April 9, 2014

The new class of fungicides, SDHI's, are now registered for use in tree fruit.  Fontelis was registered last season, and Luna Tranquility and Merivon were registered this spring.  They are all registered in NY as "Restricted Use" fungicides.  Due to the special restrictions for use in NY, they also are Special Local Need registrations.  In order to apply these materials you must have a copy of the label and the SLN label in your possession.  You can access these SLN and label to study or print at these links. 

Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: March 17, 2014
Feasibility of Reducing Slug Damage in Cabbage

Slugs are an increasing threat to cabbage production: The board of the New York Cabbage Research and Development Program made slug control one of their highest research priorities for the first time in 2009. Slugs are considered a sporadic pest in cabbage and are favored by cool and moist conditions, especially where crop residues are left on the soil surface. In conventional production of cabbage, slugs tend to be a problem later in the growing season along tree lines and hedgerows and in weedy patches within the field. Slugs leave large holes in the leaves with the veins intact, and can be a contaminant in the heads when they squeeze between the leaves. During the cool wet growing season of 2009, slug contaminants were the cause of several rejected loads of cabbage in New York. It is predicted that the frequency of slug problems in cabbage will increase, because more cabbage is being grown in rotation following field corn. The newer varieties of field corn are Bt-tolerant and have tougher stalks that take longer to break down, thus, these fields have more crop residue and are more favorable for slugs. It is worthwhile to investigate whether there are cost effective means for growers to manage sporadic infestations of slugs in cabbage.

View the exciting results from our 2010 trial in the final report that follows.


How Copper Sprays Work and Avoiding Phytotoxicity

Last Modified: June 26, 2013
How Copper Sprays Work and Avoiding Phytotoxicity

Copper has been widely used in both conventional and organic production for some time. Copper was one of the first elements used as a plant fungicide (the other was Sulfur). Its discovery can be traced back to the famous origin of Bordeaux mixture, containing a mixture of copper sulfate (CuSO4) and slaked lime, and used for downy mildew control in French vineyards. 

Identifying Ground Beetles

Last Modified: June 26, 2013
Identifying Ground Beetles

It's an easy error to make. You notice some plants being chewed. You look around for clues and spot a good sized hole in the soil nearby. If you poke around in the soil you may unearth a surprisingly large, aggressive-looking beetle and it's easy to conclude that you've found your culprit. But you would be wrong.

Spinich Leafminer- Identification and Management

Last Modified: June 26, 2013
Spinich Leafminer- Identification and Management

The spinach leafminer (Pegomya hyoscyami) is a common pest that causes unsightly leaf blisters and necrosis of spinach, beets, chards and host weeds like lambsquaters, nightshade, chickweed and plantain. Marketability of the leaf crops is significantly impacted. This is the case for beet greens and bunched beets.

Blueberry Specific Insecticides for SWD

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 31, 2013
Blueberry Specific Insecticides for SWD

Bramble Specific Insecticides for SWD

Last Modified: May 31, 2013
Bramble Specific Insecticides for SWD

Strawberry Specific Insecticides for SWD

Last Modified: May 31, 2013
Strawberry Specific Insecticides for SWD

Zero Disease Tolerance in High Tunnels

Last Modified: January 10, 2013
Zero Disease Tolerance in High Tunnels

Printed in American Vegetable Grower, October 5, 2012:
Keeping crops free of disease is the goal of all growers, including those producing in high tunnels. Download the PDF file to learn about 20 practices that will reduce the chances of pathogens taking over when growing under cover.

Exploring the Relationship Between Nitrogen, Plant Spacing and Bacterial Disease

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 8, 2013
Exploring the Relationship Between Nitrogen, Plant Spacing and Bacterial Disease

It is important to emphasize that "exploring" is in the present tense. In New York, we are just beginning to delve into the fascinating relationship between nitrogen, plant spacing and bacterial diseases of onions. Our preliminary results suggest that reduced soil nitrogen and tighter plant spacing results in less bacterial decay. In this article, we report preliminary findings from exploratory studies and the observations that lead to these trials. We stress that we are not making recommendations at this time. However, we are hopeful that further studies will lead to specific recommendations.

Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 27, 2012

The first in a 3-part series, this pre-recorded webinaris presented by Dr. Chris Smart, Cornell University. 

Flooding in 2011 spread Phytophthora capsici into fields with no history of the disease. Growers who have not managed P. capsici previously could inadvertently and permanently spread the disease to additional fields and could experience high rates of crop loss due to improper management of the disease.  Understanding of P. cap will reduce the probability of these negative outcomes on eastern NY farms.


Webinar: How do I know if I have P-Cap in my Fields?

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: November 27, 2012

The first in a 3-part series, this pre-recorded webinaris presented by Dr. Chris Smart, Cornell University. 

Flooding in 2011 spread Phytophthora capsici into fields with no history of the disease. Growers who have not managed P. capsici previously could inadvertently and permanently spread the disease to additional fields and could experience high rates of crop loss due to improper management of the disease.  Understanding of P. cap will reduce the probability of these negative outcomes on eastern NY farms.


Spotted Wing Drosophila in Tomatoes

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: September 13, 2012
Spotted Wing Drosophila in Tomatoes

Although this new pest in gaining attention from berry growers, it is also a threat to tomatoes.  Spotted wing Drosophila (SWD) lays eggs in ripe or maturing fruit with a rear-end that favors a miniature hack-saw. The eggs, which have creepy breathing tubes, hatch out into nasty worms that feed inside the fruit creating a liquefied mass. Reports on tomatoes mention organic, heirloom and high tunnel crops. A common theme to these observations is that insecticides are generally absent. SWD has been reported in 2012 throughout the state, so far in traps and fruit plantings (see map courtesy of Hudson Valley Fruit Program). Likely there are unreported cases of infested tomatoes. 

Cranberry and Cherry Fruit Worm

Last Modified: August 22, 2012
Cranberry and Cherry Fruit Worm

A number of growers have been calling with a question about blueberry clusters strung together with webbing or frass or both. Most people cannot find a larvae (although they are there!), but are alarmed with picker complaints. The pest in question is fruit worm either cranberry or cherry. Both insects have very similar life cycles and the damage is similar, but the chemical control materials differ slightly, so it will be important to be able to differentiate. 


The adult moths lay their eggs in late May and early June at the base of the newly set fruit. Larvae of both
species attack green fruit. There are sex pheromones  available for both pests and monitoring should begin in late April to optimize spray timing. Usually two sprays are necessary the first at petal fall and the second 10 days later. Organically approved materials include Entrust and Dipel DF. Other materials include Azasol, or Molt-X, Sevin, Malathion, Imidan, Esteem and Delegate, among others. 

Check the Guidelines for more control information and visit this site for fact sheets about fruitworms:  http://www.fruit.cornell.edu/berry/ipm/ipmpdfs/bbfruitworm.pdf
 


Effects of Fruit Cooling on Spotted Wing Drosophila

Last Modified: August 22, 2012
Effects of Fruit Cooling on Spotted Wing Drosophila

O-zone Injury on Vegetables

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: August 22, 2012
O-zone Injury on Vegetables

Hot, humid weather with stagnant air masses may lead to ozone damage on crops. Ozone warnings were recently issued for much of New York. These warnings are intended for people with respiratory problems and let them know they should limit their outdoor activity and try to stay as much as possible in air-conditioned locations. These warning are also a good indicator that ozone damage may occur in plants.

Spotted Winged Drosophila found locally and throughout New York and New England

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: August 7, 2012
Spotted Winged Drosophila found locally and throughout New York and New England

In light of these findings, blueberry, summer and fall raspberry and day-neutral strawberry growers are urged to be vigilant about this pest.  

Managing Weeds in Carrot Fields

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: June 21, 2012
Managing Weeds in Carrot Fields

Tips on how to manage weeds in carrots, including special problems like swamp dodder


Garlic Weed Control

Crystal Stewart-Courtens, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: May 24, 2012
Garlic Weed Control

View the following document for the latest information for weed control in garlic, in both organic and conventional practices. 

Leek Moth Control and Information

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: May 24, 2012
Leek Moth Control and Information

Leek Moth was detected in four home gardens in Plattsburg, NY in 2009. It was first detected in Ontario, Canada in 1997 where it has become problematic especially to small-scale, organic growers in eastern Ontario and to commercial producers in western Quebec, who have limited insecticides available to them.

Leek Moth continues its spread to more farms and gardens across the U.S., a new comprehensive website is available to aid in the identification and management of this pest. This Cornell website features maps of the distribution of leek moth, protocols on insect monitoring and identification, best management practices for farms and home gardens, a photo gallery of damage symptoms and a comprehensive resource section.

Visit the Leek Moth website.


Seed Treatments for Onion Maggot Control in Onions

Last Modified: May 24, 2012
Seed Treatments for Onion Maggot Control in Onions

New York onion growers FINALLY have not one, but TWO new seed treatment options for control of onion maggot. Sepresto® was first introduced for the 2011 growing season, but is available only on Nunhem's onion varieties. Also available for the 2012 growing season on all onion varieties is Farmore® FI500. Both of these insecticide seed treatments are only available in packages that also include fungicides. Altogether, NY onion growers now have FIVE insecticides (counting diazinon), labeled for onion maggot control. Of these, 3 are seed treatments; decisions for which one to use must be made when seed orders are placed. In making these decisions, it is important to know the relative efficacy of the insecticides, what diseases the fungicides in the seed treatment packages control and how to extend the useful life of these precious new insecticides. The information that follows addresses these questions and should assist you in making a decision on how to control maggots as well as early season seedling diseases.

2011 Pumpkin Herbicide Trial

Chuck Bornt, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 2, 2012
2011  Pumpkin Herbicide Trial

The Capital District Vegetable & Small Fruit Program evaluated current herbicides and one un-labeled herbicide for pumpkins. Weed control ratings and the cost associated with each prodcut can be found in the the full pdf. 

Designing a Better Sprayer for Pesticide Application in Strawberries

Laura McDermott, Team Leader, Small Fruit and Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

Last Modified: April 2, 2012

Strawberry growers using conventional boom sprayers find it difficult to obtain good disease and insect control due to poor pesticide coverage on the undersides of leaves, on the lower leaves, and on the fruit when the strawberry plant is in full canopy. Inadequate crop protectant coverage results in higher levels of disease and insect activity translating to consumer rejection of poor quality fruit and lower overall profitability of the planting.

This project allowed an opportunity to work with strawberries: a high value crop with a low, 3-dimensional canopy. Strawberry diseases are a big concern for growers, so adequate spray coverage is important; better coverage would allow growers to make fewer applications of fungicides during the growing season.

Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2012
Greenhouse Cucumber Variety Trial (2011)

The unheated greenhouse, or high tunnel, offers a vertical production environment suitable for crops such as indeterminate tomatoes and cucumbers. As it is a soil based system however, and passively heated, greenhouse cucumbers must be transplanted later in the spring than tomatoes, due to their intolerance for low root zone temperatures. However, cucumbers can provide good returns when grown in a high tunnel, given consistent pest control and matching variety performance with market demand. A variety trial of four greenhouse cucumbers was established in a cooperating high tunnel in the spring of 2011.

High Tunnel Tomato Trial 2011 (determinate varieties)

Judson Reid, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2012
High Tunnel Tomato Trial 2011 (determinate varieties)

High tunnel tomatoes continue to grow in popularity with New York vegetable growers for disease control, earliness and fruit quality. Variety selection is one of the most important management decisions for tunnels. The decision between determinate and indeterminate varieties depends on grower preference and market demand. Total yield must be balanced with fruit quality and disease resistance

Stop the Rot! - Using Cultural Practices to Manage Bacterial Diseases of Onion

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2012
Stop the Rot! - Using Cultural Practices to Manage Bacterial Diseases of Onion

Narrow plant spacing reduced bacterial bulb decay by 53 to 64%
Do you know how easy this is? A simple modification to adjust your planting configuration is all it would take to drastically reduce losses from bacterial bulb decay. Our studies showed that when plant spacing was reduced from 6 or 8 inches to 4 inches with 3 or 4 rows per 3-foot plastic mulch bed (row spacing: 4 rows = 6 inch; 3 rows = 8 inch), this provided 53 to 64% control of bacterial bulb decay at harvest (Table 1). Marketable yield also increased by 1.4 to 2.4 times, representing an increased net economic return of $43 to $258 per 100 feet of bed, due to increased weight of marketable jumbo-sized bulbs (Table 1). We learned that wide plant spacing produces big bushy plants with more leaves, thicker necks, delayed maturity and bigger bulbs. Unfortunately, it was these bigger bulbs that rotted! By narrowing plant spacing, we got fewer colossal-sized bulbs, which we more than made up for by having significantly more healthy jumbo-sized bulbs to market (Table 1).

Alternatives to black plastic reduced bacterial bulb decay by 59 to 75%
This is also a very simple and easy modification for small-scale growers producing onions on plastic mulch to make to their cultural practices that could go a very long way towards reducing bacterial bulb decay. Our studies showed that reflective silver mulch, biodegradable black plastic and bare ground had significantly 1.8 to 2.8 times higher marketable yield than black plastic (Table 2). Reflective silver and biodegradable black plastics had significantly 3.7 and 3.6 times, respectively, higher jumbo weight than black plastic, which resulted in an increased net return of $96 to $215 per 100 feet of bed compared to black plastic (Table 2). All of the alternatives to black plastic had significantly lower soil temperatures compared to the black plastic; we suspect that the higher temperatures of the black plastic are more favorable for development of bacterial diseases.


Resource Guide for Organic Insect and Disease Management

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: April 1, 2012
Resource Guide for Organic Insect and Disease Management

Organic farmers rely primarily on preventive, cultural and integrated methods of pest and disease management. However, there are a number of materials available for use that can complement and support organic management. This guide was developed to provide a useful and scientifically accurate reference for organic farmers and agricultural professionals searching for information on best practices, available materials and perhaps most importantly, the efficacy of materials that are permitted for use in organic systems.

Nightshade Management Reduces Crop Loss

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: March 20, 2012
Nightshade Management Reduces Crop Loss

Depending on the crop, nightshade can reduce crop yields, harbor diseases, and cause crops to be rejected by processors. Learn about the species of nightshades in NY, physiological differences between them, emergence and growth information, and control strategies.

Wild Proso Millet

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: March 20, 2012
Wild Proso Millet

Wild proso millet is present in NY and can be a problem weed in sweet corn and other vegetable crops. Learn how to identify this weed on your farm.

Buckwheat Strips to Attract Beneficial Insects in Potato Production

Robert Hadad, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: January 12, 2012
Buckwheat Strips to Attract Beneficial Insects in Potato Production

Download a report of field plot strategies for using buckwheat strips to attract beneficial insects for the control of Colorado potato beetle in potato production (2009/2010). This project was funded by the Organic Farming Research Federation.

Fall Application of Dual Magnum for Yellow Nutsedge Control in Muck Onions

Christy Hoepting, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: September 14, 2011
Fall Application of Dual Magnum for Yellow Nutsedge Control in Muck Onions

Yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.) pressure is very high in certain muck areas where onions are grown. It appears to have become more of a problem in recent years. Onion growers and chemical company representatives believe that applying Dual Magnum, active ingredient metalochlor, in the fall can significantly reduce nutsedge pressure the following spring. However, weed scientists across the country do not believe that fall applications of metalochlor would have any effect on nutsedge populations the following spring, because the dissipation of metolachlor, is relatively rapid, 4-7 weeks in the northern United States. Dual Magnum is labeled as a fall application in field corn and soybeans only in Iowa, Minnesota, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. For this use, there are restrictions on the label that state the date after which Dual Magnum may be applied, that soil temperature in the top 4 inches must consistently be 55°F and lower, and that tillage following incorporation must not exceed the 2-3 inch depth of incorporation.

Swede Midge Website

Julie Kikkert, Team Leader, Extension Vegetable Specialist
Cornell Vegetable Program

Last Modified: June 29, 2010
Swede Midge Website

As swede midge continues to spread to more farms and gardens across the United States, a comprehensive website is available to aid in the identification and management of this pest of cole crops.


more crops
Apples

Apples

Apricots

Apricots

Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Blueberries

Blueberries

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cherries

Cherries

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Grapes

Grapes

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Nectarines

Nectarines

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peaches

Peaches

Pears

Pears

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Plums

Plums

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Raspberries / Blackberries

Raspberries / Blackberries

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Strawberries

Strawberries

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops

Upcoming Events

Announcements

U-Pick Farm Practices During Covid-19 Pandemic

U-Pick is a critical direct marketing approach for many of our farms and provides
customers with a unique connection to fresh produce grown close to home. In light
of what we understand about the spread of COVID-19, new management practices
will be needed to protect your farm team and your customers. This document
provides recommended practices and communication strategies for U-Pick
operations for the 2020 season.

https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_864.pdf

Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


Podcasts

2020 Biweekly Vegetable News Podcast - Episode 8- 7/29/20

July 29, 2020
The July 29, 2020 edition of the Eastern New York Vegetable News covers the following topics:
• Stink bug injury and gold flecking in tomatoes (1:14)
• Pandemic unemployment assistance and COVID-19 tax credits for paid leave (5:51)
• Pest management in wash/pack sheds (8:43)
• 2020 Pea variety trial research results (13:41)
• Irrigation for berry production (28:26)

Here are links to research and resources mentioned in this episode:

Pandemic unemployment insurance
https://dol.ny.gov/pandemic-unemployment-assistance

COVID-19 Tax credits for paid leave
https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/covid-19-related-tax-credits-for-required-paid-leave-provided-by-small-and-midsize-businesses-faqs

Pest management in wash/pack sheds and water testing reminder
Map to locate a water testing lab near you:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?mid=1C8KHM6jJszj9auYQttUbVtPKtb4eEBSJ&ll=42.61785481629028%2C-74.43670986250001&z=6

2020 Pea variety trial research results
Research report: https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_908.pdf

Irrigation for Berry Production
For more in depth information about choosing an irrigation system, refer to the Pennsylvania State University Ag Alternatives fact sheet titled: Irrigation for Fruit and Vegetable Production.
https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_910.pdf

Stink Bug Injury and Gold Flecking in Tomatoes
https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_909.pdf

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