Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture Enrollment

Program Areas

  • Food Safety
  • Variety Evaluation
  • Market Development
  • Pest Management
  • Cultural Practices

Enrollment Benefits

  • Telephone / Email Consultations
  • Newsletter
  • Direct Mailings
  • Educational Meetings & Conferences
  • In-Field Educational Opportunities
  • On-Farm Research Trials

ENYCH Enrollment Form (PDF; 710KB)

Enrollee Login

Password:

Log In To Access:

  • Helpful Diagnostic Tool:
      What's wrong with my crop?

Not an Enrollee? Enroll Now!

Online Enrollment Form

Common Asparagus Beetle Management During Harvest Season

Ethan Grundberg, Vegetable Specialist
Eastern New York Commercial Horticulture

May 9, 2018

The beginning stages of Common asparagus beetle (Crioceris asparagiI) infestations often go unnoticed. Since the beetles have two to three generations per year (depending upon where you are in our region), the population can build quickly over the course of a couple of years and catch growers off-guard at harvest. 

Overwintered adults emerge from their pupae about the same time that asparagus spears begin to push. They quickly begin to feed on the tender shoots causing a sort of rasping damage that browns quickly in the field or post-harvest. The beetles then mate and deposit their eggs in vertical lines along the spears as shown in the image. After about a week, those eggs hatch into small grubs that continue to feed on spears before pupating in the soil. 

Though the larvae, not adults, are most susceptible to insecticides, growers experiencing significant early damage (the economic threshold is suggested to be when 5%-10% of spears have adults present) may need to use an insecticide to knock down the adults before targeting larvae and later generations on ferns. Given the need to continue harvesting every 1-2 days (a practice that also helps remove eggs from the field to slow the population growth), a short Pre-Harvest Interval (PHI) and Restricted Entry Interval (REI) are key to selecting an appropriate labeled insecticide. 

The standard insecticide options are pyrethroids (IRAC Group 3A), such as Pounce 25 WP and other labeled permethrin formulations (1 day PHI, 12 hour REI) or PyGanic 5.0 (OMRI, 0 day PHI, 12 hour REI). Some neonicitnoids (IRAC Group 4A), such as Assail 70 WP and Anarchy 30 SG (both acetamiprid), are also labeled for asparagus beetle adults and larvae during harvest (1 day PHI, 12 hour REI). Lannate (methomyl, IRAC Group 1A), is also options if you are willing to equip the harvest crew with early entry PPE (1 day PHI, 48 hour REI) to continue removing egg masses on cut spears. An easier option for those looking to use an organophosphate is Sevin XLR Plus (carbaryl, 1 day PHI, 12 hour REI). Note that Lorsban (chlorpyrifos) is sometimes recommended in other states, but IS NOT allowed for use on asparagus in New York. 

For heavily infested fields, continue scouting the asparagus after harvest and target second and/or third generations with any of the options listed above or with IRAC Group 5 spinosyns, such as Radiant or Entrust (OMRI), both of which have a 60 day PHI. Cleaning fields of old stalks after mowing in the fall can also help reduce the overwintering populations.  

Image 11. Common asparagus beetle adults feeding on an emerging spear
Image 22. Grayish colored asparagus beetle eggs visible in a vertical line on a young spear




more crops
Apples

Apples

Apricots

Apricots

Asparagus

Asparagus

Beets

Beets

Blueberries

Blueberries

Broccoli

Broccoli

Brussels Sprouts

Brussels Sprouts

Cabbage

Cabbage

Carrots

Carrots

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

Cherries

Cherries

Cucumbers

Cucumbers

Dry Beans

Dry Beans

Eggplant

Eggplant

Ethnic Vegetables

Ethnic Vegetables

Garlic

Garlic

Grapes

Grapes

Horseradish

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Leeks

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Lettuce / Leafy Greens

Melons

Melons

Nectarines

Nectarines

Onions

Onions

Parsnips

Parsnips

Peaches

Peaches

Pears

Pears

Peas

Peas

Peppers

Peppers

Plums

Plums

Potatoes

Potatoes

Pumpkins / Gourds

Pumpkins / Gourds

Radishes

Radishes

Raspberries / Blackberries

Raspberries / Blackberries

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Rutabaga

Rutabaga

Snap Beans

Snap Beans

Squash - Summer

Squash - Summer

Squash- Winter

Squash- Winter

Strawberries

Strawberries

Sweet Corn

Sweet Corn

Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Tomatoes

Tomatoes

Turnips

Turnips

more crops

Upcoming Events

Weed Management for Berries in NY

March 6, 2024 : Weed Management for Berries in NY

Join Cornell scientists, Dr. Bryan Brown, Dr. Lynn Sosnoskie, Rutgers University's Dr. Thierry Besançon, CCE Harvest NY's Anya Osatuke, and CCE ENYCHP's Laura McDermott to hear updates on the latest research concerning weed management in berries.

View Weed Management for Berries in NY Details

Northeast Extension Fruit Consortium Winter Webinar Series

March 6, 2024
March 13, 2024
March 20, 2024
: Northeast Extension Fruit Consortium Winter Webinar Series

View Northeast Extension Fruit Consortium Winter Webinar Series Details

How Profitable will My New Orchard Investment Be? Evaluating Capital Investment Decisions in a Farm Business

February 29, 2024 : Week 1 of the course (February 23-Feb 29)

In week 1 we cover:

  • How and why to use a structured process to make investment decisions.
  • Identifying the problem to be addressed, generating possible solutions and identifying what information you need to acquire.
  • Gathering data and using farm financial statements and farm financial ratios to help make decisions.

 In this zoom session we will go over what you learned in the on-line class.


March 7, 2024 : Week 2 (March 1 - March 7)

In week 2 you will:

  • Develop an enterprise budget and use your enterprise budgets and partial budget analysis to evaluate the risk and profitability of potential investments.
  • Use cost-benefit analysis tools that consider the time value of money to help you choose among investment options.
  • View How Profitable will My New Orchard Investment Be? Evaluating Capital Investment Decisions in a Farm Business Details

    Announcements

    2023 Spotted Wing Drosophila Monitoring/Management

    All berry farmers are watching for monitoring reports that indicate Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) adults are in their region. Mid-season berry crops should be sprayed as soon as berries begin to ripen unless you've elected to use insect exclusion netting.

    - For general information about SWD, and to enroll for free monitoring reports, visit the Cornell SWD blog https://blogs.cornell.edu/swd1/.
    - Click here for the 2023 Quick Guide for Pesticide Management. 
    - For some great instructional videos and fact sheets on insect exclusion netting, visit the University of Vermont's Ag Engineering blog.


    Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

    We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

    We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

    There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

    The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

    Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

    If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


    Podcasts

    Winter Greens Grower Interviews in Northern New York

    October 22, 2022
    In this episode, vegetable specialist Elisabeth Hodgdon interviews Lindsey Pashow, ag business development and marketing specialist with the Cornell Cooperative Extension Harvest New York team. They discuss findings from a series of interviews with winter greens producers in northern New York. Lindsey shares production and marketing challenges associated with growing winter greens in this cold and rural part of the state, success stories and advice from growers, and tips for those interested in adding new crop enterprises to their operation.

    Funding for this project was provided by the Northern New York Agricultural Development Program. The episode was edited by Miles Todaro of the ENYCHP team.

    Resources:
    • Crop enterprise budget resources available from Penn State Extension (field and tunnel vegetables: https://extension.psu.edu/small-scale-field-grown-and-season-extension-budgets), UMass Extension (winter spinach budgets: https://ag.umass.edu/vegetable/outreach-project/improving-production-yield-of-winter-greens-in-northeast and field vegetables: https://ag.umass.edu/vegetable/fact-sheets/crop-production-budgets), and Cornell Cooperative Extension (high tunnel vegetables: https://blogs.cornell.edu/hightunnels/economics/sample-budgets-spreadsheets/). Use these budgets as templates when developing your own crop enterprise budget.
    • The Organic Farmer’s Business Handbook, by Richard Wiswall
    • The Winter Harvest Handbook, by Eliot Coleman

    For questions about the winter greens project discussed in this podcast, reach out to Lindsey Pashow (lep67@cornell.edu) or Elisabeth Hodgdon(eh528@cornell.edu).

    listen now

    view all podcasts
    NEWSLETTERS  |   CURRENT PROJECTS  |   IMPACT IN NY  |   SPONSORSHIP  |   RESOURCES  |   SITE MAP