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Apple Thinning Suggestions for 2018

May 21, 2018

Options for the Petal Fall Spray

 

  • First, calculate your TRV. You need to know how much product your trees will need.

 

  • Check out the handout that was distributed during the meeting, titled Spray Mixing Instructions Considering Tree Row Volume.

 

  • Read the our TRV article posted to the Cornell ENYCHP website here:

 

  • Carbaryl - it is a mild thinner and it will hardly over-thin (except Cortland). Be sure you have all bees out before spraying Carbaryl.

 

  • Amid-Thin- This is a mild thinner that can be used at bloom and petal fall.  It should be used at the highest label rate suggested, 8 oz/100 gal TRV dilute. A surfactant could be included in the tank.

 

  • NAA- When more aggressive thinning is required, NAA is frequently the thinner selected. It is not so aggressive at petal fall as compared with when it is applied at the 7 to 14 mm fruit size stage.  During bloom and petal fall it can generally be safely used at a rate of 10 ppm without over thinning.   Add 1 pt Sevin (TRV dilute) for harder to thin cultivars.

 

  • Maxcel at 100ppm (64oz/100gal TRV dilute) + 1 pt Sevin (TRV dilute) is a good option for Gala to get some sizing.

When fruit-set is clear, and if heavy on hard-to-thin varieties such as Gala or on biennial bearing varieties such as Honeycrisp, Macoun and Golden Delicious we are recommending to use 7.5 to 10 ppm NAA plus 1pt Carbaryl /100 gallons TRV dilute at petal fall.

 

Thinning Recommendations for the Petal fall and 8-12 mm spray (when indicated) in 2018:

Varieties where we like Maxcel + Sevin

 

        Gala - Promalin at Pink to Full Bloom of the King flower, 64 oz Maxcel (100ppm BA) /100 gallons TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute at Petal and again 8-12mm size. You can also use 7.5ppm NAA + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute at petal fall and come back at 8-12mm size with the Maxcel option.

 

  • Empire - 48 oz Maxcel (75 ppm BA) /100 gallons TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute (petal fall and 8-12mm size).

        Jonamac - 48 oz Maxcel (75 ppm BA) /100 gallons TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute

 

        Macoun - It has to have a petal fall spray to stimulate return bloom (7.5ppm NAA plus 1 pint Sevin/100 gallons TRV dilute). At 8-12mm use 48 oz Maxcel (75 ppm BA)  /100 gallons TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute

 

        Fuji - Bloom 4 ounces NAA (10ppm) /100 Gallons TRV Dilute, then 48-64 oz Maxcel  (75-100 ppm BA) /100 gallons TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute (petal fall and 8-10mm)

 

        Red Delicious - 48 oz Maxcel (75 ppm BA) /100 gallons TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute. Do not use NAA because of pygmy fruit formation. A dose of 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute would work if fruit set is low and you want to break clusters.

 

        We like the 1 pint of Promalin at full bloom, you get some fruit typiness but furthermore you get some thinning.

Varieties where NAA works well

 

        McIntosh - respond well to both Maxcel and NAA. So, 2oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa (5ppm NAA)/100 gal TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute will work great. AceyMac thins harder than the true Macs - 7.5ppm NAA + 1pt Sevin.

 

        Honeycrisp - mature Honeycrisps are hard to thin because of the vigor level of the tree - less competition. Use 3oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa (7.5ppm NAA)/100 gal TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute. Put 10ppm NAA at bloom and 7.5ppm NAA + carbaryl at PF and again at 8-12mm. It will help flower initiation.

 

        Cortland - It doesn't like carbaryl and it thins very easy, so use 2oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa (5ppm NAA)/100 gal TRV dilute at 8-12 mm size.

 

        Gingergold - 1oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa (2.5ppm NAA)/100 gal TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute at 8-12 mm size

 

        NY1 and NY2- according to our 3rd year trial both varieties are responding well to either BA or NAA (Maxcel is preferable due fruit size): 64 oz Maxcel /100 gallons TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute OR 3oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa/100 gal TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute (petal fall and 8-10mm). NY2 can be biennial if over-cropped.

 

        Golden Delicious - If you use Provide to control russeting at petal fall, then Golden thins easier and 10ppm of NAA (4oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa /100 gal TRV dilute) + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute is ok, otherwise put 15ppm NAA on. Maxcel works OK on golden, but it is the toughest variety for Maxcel to thin well - 64oz.

 

        Rome Beauty -5ppm NAA (2oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa /100 gal TRV dilute) + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute (spur type use 7.5ppm NAA) - 8-12mm.

 

        Northern Spy - it is a biennial, and it needs a bloom or petal fall with 2oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa (5ppm)/100 gal TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute.

 

        Idared: It thins very easily. Use 2.5ppm NAA (1oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa /100 gal TRV dilute) + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute at 8-12mm.

 

        Jonagold: use moderate rates 7.5ppm NAA (3oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa /100 gal TRV dilute + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute) at 12-14mm - one time.

 

        Pink Lady: it thins very easy. Use 2.5 to 5ppm NAA (1oz to 2oz Fruitone L or Pomaxa /100 gal TRV dilute) + 1pt Sevin/100 gal TRV dilute at 8-12mm.

 

Thinning Without Carbaryl

  • Use the same rates at petal fall and 10-12mm

 

  • As a rule of thumb 7.5ppm NAA can replace 1pt carbaryl in moderate to hard-to-thin varieties. However, this does not apply for varieties such as Fuji and Red Delicious as pygmy fruit may result.

 

  • HC - 32oz Maxcel + 3oz Fruitone L/100 gal TRV dilute

 

  • Gala -  64oz Maxcel + 3oz Fruitone L /100 gal TRV dilute

 

  • Empire - 48oz Maxcel + 3oz Fruitone L/100 gal TRV dilute

 

  • Macoun - 3 oz Fruitone L (7.5ppm NAA) + 48oz Maxcel /100 gal TRV dilute

 

  • Golden Delicious - 3 oz Fruitone L (7.5ppm NAA) + 48oz Maxcel /100 gal TRV dilute, or a long time program used in NJ for Goldens is at 8-12MM use pint of Ethephon /100 gal TRV dilute plus 4 ounces of NAA (10PPM NAA) /100 gal TRV dilute

 

  • Jonagold - 3oz fruitone + 32 oz Maxcel/100 gal TRV dilute

 

  • NY1 and NY2 = 64oz Maxcel + 3oz Fruitone L /100 gal TRV dilute

 

  • Red Delicious and Fuji - start with a petal fall spray using 8oz Amid Thin//100 gal TRV dilute. Then two shots of 48-64oz Maxcel alone - one at petal fall and another one right after at 8-10mm for Red Delicious and Fuji.

 

  • It might be good to use 10ppm NAA/100 gal TRV dilute at bloom on Fuji, but we do not have any data to support. 


  • Amid Thin at 8oz/100 TRV dilute is a good option for bloom and petal fall for all varieties, including Fuji and Red Delicious as it's not known to cause pygmy fruit.

 

Chemical thinning program for Young Trees:

• For newly planted trees where you desire to totally eliminate the crop try a high rate of Maxcel (64 ounces) + Sevin (2pts) + Oil (1pt) /100 gallon TRV dilute when fruit size is 8-10mm. Or , as soon as the bees are out, begin repeated heavy doses of carbaryl (2 pints/100 gallons) tank-mixed with Regulaid (1 pint/100 gallons).

• For 2nd year trees where we want a small crop use only hand thinning and the Cornell young tree thinning guide to adjust crop load. 

• For 3rd year trees use Sevin alone + follow-up hand-thinning.

• For 4th year trees use 1/2 of our suggested full rate of NAA + Sevin or Maxce l+ Sevin.

• For 5th year trees use 75% of a full rate of NAA + Sevin or Maxcel + Sevin.

• For 6th year trees use a full rate of NAA + Sevin or Maxcel + Sevin.

Cautions

• We suggest that Captan not be added to or near thinning sprays.



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Upcoming Events

Farm Financial Management Tuesdays - Planning for a Change or Exiting Your Farm Business

November 30, 2021 : Assessing the Financial Ramifications of and Options for Significant Change to Your Farm Business

The inflationary economy is upon us! The huge influx of money into the US economy following the COVID-19 pandemic has manufactured high prices and in turn increased operating costs for farm business thus forcing many businesses into net operating loss situations. Other farms are facing high labor costs or chronic labor shortages.  Some farms have taken on debt loads that make these increased costs unaffordable.  Depending on the stage in the business lifecycle, it may make sense to change enterprises or exit the farming business entirely. 

Join CCE ENYCH Ag Business Educator, Elizabeth Higgins, and CAAHP Ag Business Educator, Dayton Maxwell, for a one-hour program to learn about the financial aspects of changing or exiting a farm business. 

December 7, 2021 : The Family and Emotional Component; Shifting Business Direction and Life After Farming

As farm business enterprises are changed or disbanded, the emotional stress can be tremendous, especially when individuals and family members maintain diminished assurance relative to future security. 

Join Gabriel Gurley and Brenda O'Brien of New York FarmNet for a one-hour program focused on successfully navigating the emotional turmoil of a family farm business transition.

December 14, 2021 : New Venture Creation; Shifting Business Direction and Life After Farming

Change creates opportunity and new opportunities are certain when farm businesses change or end. 

Join Gabriel Gurley of New York FarmNet for a one-hour overview of identifying ways and means to capitalize on new opportunities resulting from farm business transitions.

 

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Remote Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Course - Dec 2021

December 8 - December 9, 2021

A grower training course developed by the Produce Safety Alliance (PSA) that meets the regulatory requirements of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) for farms subject to the Produce Safety Rule. All farms are welcome to attend to learn about recommended food safety practices for growing, handling, and storing fresh produce. Course registration fee includes a course manual and certificate of course completion by the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO).

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Tax Management for Beginning and Small Farm Businesses

January 18, 2022

Tax Management for Beginning and Small Farm Businesses.

A one-night virtual meeting for beginning and part-time farmers that provides useful tax information enabling participants to be make better tax decisions for their business.   Federal and state income taxes will be covered. Tax regulations specific to NYS will be covered as well. 


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Announcements

2021 SWD Insecticide Quick Guide

Prepare your sprayer and make sure you have the insecticides of choice on hand. Click on the following link for the revised 2021 SWD Insecticide Quick Guide: https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_981.pdf

Current recommendations are to use the most effective material you can early in the spray program - even though the population seems small. The strategy is to keep the population small for as long as possible as it's very hard to gain control after the numbers have ballooned.  

USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for Producers

USDA Offers Disaster Assistance for Producers Facing Inclement Weather

Severe weather events create significant challenges and often result in catastrophic loss for agricultural producers. Despite every attempt to mitigate risk, your operation may suffer losses. USDA offers several programs to help with recovery.

Risk Management
For producers who have risk protection through Federal Crop Insurance or the Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program (NAP), we want to remind you to report crop damage to your crop insurance agent or the local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office.

If you have crop insurance, contact your agency within 72 hours of discovering damage and be sure to follow up in writing within 15 days. If you have NAP coverage, file a Notice of Loss (also called Form CCC-576) within 15 days of loss becoming apparent, except for hand-harvested crops, which should be reported within 72 hours.

Disaster Assistance
USDA also offers disaster assistance programs, which is especially important to livestock, fruit and vegetable, specialty and perennial crop producers who have fewer risk management options.
First, the Livestock Indemnity Program (LIP) and Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybee and Farm-raised Fish Program (ELAP) reimburses producers for a portion of the value of livestock, poultry and other animals that died as a result of a qualifying natural disaster event or for loss of grazing acres, feed and forage. And, the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) provides assistance to producers of grazed forage crop acres that have suffered crop loss due to a qualifying drought. Livestock producers suffering the impacts of drought can also request Emergency Haying and Grazing on Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) acres.

For LIP and ELAP, you will need to file a Notice of Loss for livestock and grazing or feed losses within 30 days and honeybee losses within 15 days. For TAP, you will need to file a program application within 90 days.

Documentation
It's critical to keep accurate records to document all losses following this devastating cold weather event. Livestock producers are advised to document beginning livestock numbers by taking time and date-stamped video or pictures prior to after the loss.

Other common documentation options include:
- Purchase records
- Production records
- Vaccination records
- Bank or other loan documents
- Third-party certification

Additional Resources
On farmers.gov, the Disaster Assistance Discovery Tool, Disaster-at-a-Glance fact sheet, and Farm Loan Discovery Tool can help you determine program or loan options.

While we never want to have to implement disaster programs, we are here to help. To file a Notice of Loss or to ask questions about available programs, contact the Rensselaer County USDA Service Center @ 518 271 1889 ext. 2. The office is open for business, however due to pandemic restrictions all in-person visits require an appointment.


Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


Podcasts

FSMA Updates with Gretchen Wall

August 10, 2021
In this episode, Elisabeth Hodgdon discusses news and updates related to FSMA’s Produce Safety Rule with food safety specialist Gretchen Wall. They discuss inspection schedules for the 2021 season, On Farm Readiness Reviews, water testing, new resources available for growers, and more.

Resources:
Records Required by the FSMA Produce Safety Rule, by K. Woods, D. Stoeckel, B. Fick, G. Wall, and E.A. Bihn. This fact sheet includes an explanation of required records as well as printable record templates:
https://producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/sites/producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/files/shared/documents/Records-Required-by-the-FSMA-PSR.pdf

Upcoming Remote, Online, and In-Person Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Courses:
https://producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/training/grower-training-courses/upcoming-grower-trainings/

Interactive Google map of water testing labs, created by the Northeast Center to Advance Food Safety:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/viewer?amp%3Busp=sharing&mid=1C8KHM6jJszj9auYQttUbVtPKtb4eEBSJ&ll=41.22288057139939%2C-78.58548244999999&z=5\

Interested in joining the Produce Safety Alliance listserv? Sign up here to receive FSMA updates, notifications of educational opportunities and new resources, and more:
https://producesafetyalliance.cornell.edu/

Contact Information:
To schedule an On Farm Readiness Review or discuss your farm’s FSMA PSR coverage status, contact Steve Schirmer (315-487–0852 or steve.schirmer@agriculture.ny.gov), or Aaron Finley (518-474-5235 or aaron.finley@agriculture.ny.gov).

Episode speakers:
Elisabeth Hodgdon, ENYCHP vegetable specialist: 518-650-5323 or eh528@cornell.edu
Gretchen Wall, Produce Safety Alliance coordinator and Northeast Regional Extension Associate: 607-882-3087 or glw53@cornell.edu

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