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Effects of Fruit Cooling on Spotted Wing Drosophila

August 22, 2012

Effects of Fruit Cooling on Spotted Wing Drosophila

In some of the first literature written in Japan in 1939 (Kanzawa, T.) about spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, (SWD), experiments were made regarding the sensitivity of the egg and larval stages of spotted wing drosophila to periods of temperatures above and below freezing (32o F).


As is noted in the two graphs below, at constant temperatures of up to 35o F, 96 hours or more of cooling resulted in total mortality of spotted wing drosophila eggs and larvae. This was also anecdotally confirmed in tests conducted in 2009 in California.

While temperatures below freezing are not useful to fruit shippers, temperatures in the area of 35o F are useful. However, it is important to note that for success the constancy of the temperature is critical. So, while in an ideal situation constant temperatures of 35o F or a little below are effective in SWD egg and larvae suppression when extended for periods longer than 96 hours, the reality can vary significantly from the ideal. Shipped fruit ordinarily do not experience lengthy regimes of constant temperature as they are moved from place to place. Temperatures of a refrigerator truck can vary by location inside and placement of the produce (ie on the side, towards the bottom etc.), and certainly the temperatures at the point of sale can vary from the ideal to room temperature to even warmer.

Additionally, while initial damage from SWD on raspberries, blackberries and strawberries can be difficult to detect, this is not the case for other fruits such as cherries or blueberries, where the activity of SWD will leave an unsightly blemish.

The take home message from this information is that while extended cooling can be suppressive of SWD, growers should not rely on cooling alone. It will still be important to manage SWD in field.
Thanks to Shinji Kawai for making the information from the 1939 Kanzawa paper available.

This article was posted on the UC Santa Cruz county blog by Mark Bold on March 23, 2010.  You can view more blog posts by going to: http://cesantacruz.ucdavis.edu/Strawberry_Nursery_Plant_Production/

 



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Upcoming Events

High Tech Precision Orchard Spraying

July 20, 2020

Join us the afternoon of July 20th to learn what's new in orchard precision spraying technology. We'll be joined by Dr. Jason Deveau, Dr. Heping Zhu, and Steve Booher.  After their presentations, we will open up the meeting for all three presenters to field questions and comments. 

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Announcements

U-Pick Farm Practices During Covid-19 Pandemic

U-Pick is a critical direct marketing approach for many of our farms and provides
customers with a unique connection to fresh produce grown close to home. In light
of what we understand about the spread of COVID-19, new management practices
will be needed to protect your farm team and your customers. This document
provides recommended practices and communication strategies for U-Pick
operations for the 2020 season.

https://rvpadmin.cce.cornell.edu/uploads/doc_864.pdf

Resources from CCE ENYCHP!

We are developing new ways to connect with the CCE ENYCHP team this year! We have a Youtube page located at this link. Check out videos on Table Grape Production, Pest Updates and the 20 Minute Ag Manager - in 4 Minutes series

We have a Facebook Page here as well as an Instagram page. We keep these places updated with current projects, events, and other interesting articles and deadlines.

There are also text alerts available. Fruit and vegetable farmers in 17 Eastern NY counties can now receive real time alerts on high risk disease and pest outbreaks texted directly to their cell phone. The Eastern NY Commercial Horticulture program, which is supported by local Cornell Cooperative Extension associations, will now offer text alerts to those that enroll in our program in 2019. 

The text alerts will be reserved for important crop alerts that could impact management decisions immediately. For instance, if there were an outbreak of Late Blight in the area, this would be transmitted to vegetable growers.

Farmers can choose the crop for which they wish to receive updates. Additionally they can request that Ag Business Alerts be sent to them. These alerts might include due dates for crop insurance deadlines, market opportunities etc.

If you have questions, please contact enychp@cornell.edu


Podcasts

2020 Biweekly Vegetable News Podcast - Episode 6 7/1/20

July 2, 2020
The July 1st, 2020 edition of the Eastern New York Vegetable News covers the following topics:

Cucurbit Downy Mildew Update (1:05)
Changes to the Paycheck Protection Program (9:10)
Managing Caterpillar Pests in Brassicas (12:53)
Strawberry Renovation (17:56)
Developing a Safety Plan to Comply with NY Forward Phased Re-Opening Requirements (24:12)

Here are links to additional resources mentioned in the episode:

NY Forward Safety Plans
Introductory “how to” video for writing your plan:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V2PH3wCgdhc&feature=youtu.be

Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development NY Forward business safety plan support for farms
https://agworkforce.cals.cornell.edu/ny-forward-business-safety-plan/
• Plan templates
• Guidance and considerations for plan writing
• Links to “how to” videos
• Links to additional resources such as log templates, hand washing station plans, and more
• Webinar recordings

NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets novel coronavirus page: Guidance documents for farm businesses in multiple languages
https://agriculture.ny.gov/coronavirus

Strawberry Renovation
For more in-depth information re: strawberry renovation, visit http://www.hort.cornell.edu/fruit/nybn/newslettpdfs/2014/nybn1306.pdf.

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